Names

  • CDLI Literary 002701.01, ex. 024 & 002718.01, ex. 031

Numbers

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Details

  • Neo-Assyrian
  • Assur (mod. Qalat Sherqat)
  • School
  • ludlul bēl nēmeqi 1 (witness); enuma elish 1 (witness)

Bibliography

Lambert, Wilfred G., BWL (1960) pl. 73 VAT 10071; Lambert, Wilfred G., MC 16 (2013) 046; CCP 3.6.1.A.l (<http://ccp.yale.edu/P381770>); Oshima, Takayoshi, Babylonian Poems of Pious Sufferers (2014) text I:x

Sources

  [S4] Diri 01

  [A] Erimhuš 02

  [B] Erimhuš 03

  [S1] Mur-gud 02

CDLI Literary 002701.01, ex. 024 & 002718.01, ex. 031 [ludlul bēl nēmeqi 1 (witness); enuma elish 1 (witness)]

Obverse
x86obverse
excerpt from Erim-ḫuš II 234-237
11

bar dag

tu-pu

di-di1

“bar dag” (= “to pursue”) means tūpu. “di-di” (in Sumerian) ()

22

bar dag-dag

ta-pi

di-di-ba

“bar dag-dag” (= “to pursue”) means tāpi. “di-di-ba” (in Sumerian) ()


excerpt from Erim-ḫuš III 12-17
3a3a

šà dib

zu-un-nu-[u]

GUG

“šà-dib” (in Sumerian) means “very angry.” “gug” (in Sumerian) ()

3b3b

SU-ga-aggag

“sugag” (in Sumerian) ()

44

šà ḫul ŋál

lu-mun lìb-bi

”šà ḫul ĝál” (in Sumerian) means “evil of the heart.”

5a5a

GUG

“gug” means ()

5b5b

SU-GUG

“sugug” means ()


excerpt from Diri I 247-249
66

ku-uk-ku

KU₇.KU₇

nu-til min-a-bi

ṭa-a-bu

(The sign) KU₇.KU₇, (read) kukku, (is called) “double unfinished , (and means) “good.”

77

mat-qu

(and means) “sweet.”

88

da-áš-pu

(and means) “honeyed.”


excerpt from Principal Commentary on Šumma Izbu 121-123 [on Šumma Izbu III]
99

ni-is-sa-te

ku-

“Wailing” (= Šumma Izbu III 76) means “depression.”

1010

MIN<(ni-is-sa-te)>

ḫa-ra-ṣu2

Ditto (i.e., “wailing”) means “breaking off.”

1111

šá-pu-lu₄!(UB)

pe-e-[mu]

“Groin” (= Šumma Izbu III 79) means “thigh.”


excerpt from ḪAR-gud I 12a, 13, 17
1212

ì-dub

-pik-ki

rug-bu

“idub” (in Sumerian) means “grain storage”, (which) means “loft.”

1313

a-ga-zi

im-bu-u

mul-lu-u

“agazi” (in Sumerian) means “loss”, (which) means “compensation.”

1414

mu

ni-šu

ma--

“mu” (in Sumerian) means “vow,” (which) means “oath.”


bottom
excerpt from Maqlû IV 135-136
1515

a-na UDUN a-lik-ti a-šar-rap-ši-na-[ti]

I shall burn them in a flaming stove,

1616

dGIŠ.BAR qu-mi!(LUM) kaš-šá-pi kaš-šap-[ti]

O Gira, burn my sorcerer and [my] witch!

reverse
excerpt from Great Hymn to Šamaš 138-139
1717

dUTU i-maḫ-ḫar-ka a-lak-ti e-te-qu [pu-luḫ-ti]

O Šamaš, the caravan, who travels in fear, addresses you,

1818

DAM-GÀR al-la-ku ŠÁMAN. na-áš ki-[i-si]

The relentless merchant and (his) assistant, the purse bearer.


excerpt from Ludlul bēl nēmeqi I 82-83
1919

URU ki-i a-a-[bi] -kil-[man-ni]

My own city frowned at me like an enemy,

2020

tu-šá-ma nak-ra-tu₄ na-an-dur-ti [ma-a-ti]

As if it were a foe, [my land] (was) savage.


excerpt from Enūma eliš I 22-23
2121

e-šu-u ti-amat-ma na!(MI-)ṣir-šu-nu -[tap-pu]

Their clamour got loud, throwing Tiāmat into a turmoil,

2222

dal-ḫu-nim-ma šá ta-à-wa-tita-ma-te ka-ra-[as-sa]

They jarred the nerves of Tiāmat.


excerpt from Erra and Išum I 73-74
2323

UN-MEŠ lip-la-ḫu-ma lit-qu-na ḫu-bur-šin

May people be afraid and their noise be diminished!

2424

MÁŠ.ANŠE li-ru-ur-ma li-tur a-na ṭi-iṭ-ṭi

May animals tremble and be reduce to clay!


2525

13/163

13?/16? (day of month).

1This and the following lines should be read as a two-column excerpt in which the right column (without translation) is a continuation of the left column. Thus, BAR DAG : tu-pu = Erimḫuš II 237, BAR DAG.DAG : ta-pi = Erimḫuš II 238, DI.DI = Erimḫuš II 239, DI.DI.BA = Erimḫuš II 239.

2The equation of kūru and nissatu in the previous line is well attested elsewhere; however, the equation of the former word with ḫarāṣu, “to break off,” is unattested outside the ‘Principal Commentary’. De Zorzi (La seria teratomantica Šumma Izbu, Padova, 2014 p. 435) suggests that “riguardo a nissatu il verbo ḫarāṣu indichi consunzione, dimagrimento e generale decadimento.” Alternatively, it is tempting to assume that the association may be due to the fact that the logogram for nissatu, ZARAḪ(SAG.PA.LAGAB), could be read “retrographically” as ḫarāṣu.

3The date in school tablets usually consists of month and day, without indication of the year (see Gesche, Schulunterricht in Babylonien, 2001, p. 56). There is a small damaged sign before the three verticals that would well fit a reading U₄.