Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē I

Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē I, son of Aššur-rabi I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurrabii/index.html] is the sixty-sixth ruler of Assyria, according to the Assyrian King List [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/assyriankinglist/index.html#Mittani] (AKL). Unfortunately, the length of his reign is not known as it is damaged or missing in the extant copies of the AKL (Nassouhi [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/nassouhilist/index.html], Khorsabad [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/khorsabadlist/index.html], and SDAS [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/sdaslist/index.html]). That chronographic text records that his brother Enlil-nāṣir II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/enlilnasirii/index.html] deposed him.

Two fragmentary inscriptions are written in the name of a Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē, but it is uncertain whether these should be ascribed to the first or second Assyrian king of that name; scholars generally assign them to Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurnadinahheii/index.html] (Grayson, RIMA 1, p. 105). There is a slight possibility that Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē I is the Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē referred to in a letter of Assur-uballiṭ I from El Amarna (Rainey 2015:130 letter 16) who is credited with initiating diplomatic relations with Egypt (Kühne 1973:77-78 n.387). This may have been difficult since Assyria would have been a vassal of Mittani at that time.

Bibliography

Grayson, A.K., 'Königslisten und Chroniken. B. Akkadisch,' Reallexikon der Assyriologie und Vorderasiatische Archäologie 6 (1980-83), pp. 100-15.
Grayson, A.K. Assyrian Rulers of the Third and Second Millennia BC (to 1115 BC), (RIMA 1) 1987, Toronto, University of Toronto Press.
Kühne, C. Die Chronologie der internationalen Korrespondenz von El- Amarna, (AOAT 17) 1973, Neukirchen-Vluyn, Butzon and Bercker.
Rainey, A.F. The El-Amarna Correspondence: A New Edition of the Cuneiform Letters from the Site of El-Amarna based on Collations of all Extant Tablets, 2015, Leiden and Boston, Brill.

Yehonatan Hershkovitz

Yehonatan Hershkovitz, 'Aššur-nādin-aḫḫē I', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2017 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurnadinahhei/]

 
Back to top ^^
 
© RIAo, 2015-. RIAo is based at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Historisches Seminar (LMU Munich, History Department) - Alexander von Humboldt Chair for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East. Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/] license, 2007-17.
Oracc uses cookies only to collect Google Analytics data. Read more here [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/doc/about/cookies/index.html]; see the stats here [http://www.seethestats.com/site/oracc.museum.upenn.edu]; opt out here.
http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurnadinahhei/