Aššur-rêm-nišēšu

The Assyrian King List [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/assyriankinglist/index.html#AssurRabi] records that Aššur-rêm-nišēšu was the son of Aššur-bēl-nišēšu [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurbelnisheshu/index.html] and that his reign lasted eight years. According to one of his own inscriptions (see below), Aššur-rêm-nišēšu was the son of Aššur-nārārī II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurnarariii/index.html]. Therefore, he was the brother, not the son, of Aššur-bēl-nišēšu.

[Yehonatan Hershkovitz]

Bibliography

Grayson, A.K., 'Königslisten und Chroniken. B. Akkadisch,' Reallexikon der Assyriologie und Vorderasiatische Archäologie 6 (1980-83), pp. 100-15.

Browse the RIAo Corpus [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/pager/]


1   1001   1002   1003   1004   1005   1006  

1

Ashurremnisheshu1

KAH 1 no. 63

An inscription of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu recording his renovation of the wall of the Inner City of Aššur is known from a clay cone now in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul). This seventeen-line text is an invaluable source of information since it records the early history of that city wall. The Old Assyrian rulers Kikkiya [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/sargonicanduriiiperiods/kikkiya/index.html], Ikūnum [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/puzurashurdynasty/ikunum/index.html], Sargon I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/puzurashurdynasty/sargoni/index.html], Puzur-Aššur II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/puzurashurdynasty/puzurashurii/index.html], and Aššur-nārārī I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/ashurnararii/index.html] are named as previous builders.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005708/] of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu 1.

Source: Ist EȘEM 06870 (Ass 02764)

Bibliography

1904 Andrae, MDOG 25 pp. 66-67 (provenance, translation)
1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 p. 19 (provenance)
1905 Andrae, MDOG 27 p. 6 (provenance)
1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 63 (copy)
1911-12 Luckenbill, AJSL 28 pp. 172-73 (edition)
1913 Andrae, Festungswerke pp. 65, 155, and pl. LXXXVI (photo, copy, edition)
1915 Bezold, HKA p. 56 (edition)
1926 Meissner, IAK XIV 1 (edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §51 (translation)
1950 Landsberger and Balkan, Belleten 14 p. 253 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXX 1 (translation)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 18 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1, pp. 101-2 (edition)


1001

Parts of the building report and concluding formulae of an inscription of a king around the time of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu is known from a fragment of a clay cone discovered at Aššur. Because the object is a clay cone and since the name of the god Aššur is written as a-šùr, the object is presumed to have come from the period from Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/shamshiadadiii/index.html] to Aššur-uballiṭ I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashuruballiti/index.html]. The piece is now in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005709/] of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu 1001.

Source: Ist A 03457 (Ass 07185)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 3 (copy, edition)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1001, p. 102 (edition)


1002

A clay cone fragment discovered at Aššur and now in Istanbul (Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri) preserves parts of the last nine lines of an inscription written by an Assyrian ruler from the period between Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/shamshiadadiii/index.html] and Aššur-uballiṭ I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashuruballiti/index.html]. The name of the structure whose renovation this text commemorates is not preserved.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005710/] of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu 1002.

Source: Ist A 03440 (Ass 06235)

Bibliography

1926 Meissner, IAK XII 1 ex. A (part) (edition)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXII 1 (translation) and p. 154 (study)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 5 (copy, edition)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1002, pp. 102-3 (edition)


1003

A tiny fragment of a clay cone now in the Vorderasiatisches Museum (Berlin) is inscribed with a text of an unknown ruler, possibly Aššur-rêm-nišēšu. Because the extant text is too minuscule to edit, an edition was not included in Grayson, RIMA 2 (p. 103).

Source: VA Ass 02090 (Ass 07782)

Bibliography

1982 Rost, FuB 22 no. 3 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1003, p. 103 (edition)


1004

Another small fragment of a clay cone from Aššur has an Assyrian inscription written on it. The object, which is currently in Berlin (Vorderasiatisches Museum), likely dates sometime between the reign of Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/shamshiadadiii/index.html] and that of Aššur-uballiṭ I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashuruballiti/index.html]. Too little is preserved to warrant an edition.

Source: VA Ass 02086 Ass 18903)

Bibliography

1982 Rost, FuB 22 no. 5 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1004, p. 103 (edition)


1005

A minuscule clay cone fragment from Aššur currently in Istanbul (Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri) preserves a small portion of an inscription of an Assyrian ruler. The text, which probably come from the time from Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/shamshiadadiii/index.html] to Aššur-uballiṭ I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashuruballiti/index.html], is too tiny to warrant an edition.

Source: Ist A 03377 (Ass 02924)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 249 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1005, p. 104 (edition)


1006

A clay cone fragment coming from the period between Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/belubanidynasty/shamshiadadiii/index.html] and Aššur-uballiṭ I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashuruballiti/index.html] preserves the last three lines of an Assyrian inscription. The object is house in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005712/] of Aššur-rêm-nišēšu 1006.

Source: Ist A 03371 (Ass 02295)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 4 (copy, edition)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1, A.0.70.1006, p. 104 (edition)

Jamie Novotny & Yehonatan Hershkovitz

Jamie Novotny & Yehonatan Hershkovitz, 'Aššur-rêm-nišēšu', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2018 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/mittanianhegemony/ashurremnisheshu/]

 
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