Inscriptions, texts nos. 1001-2017

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1001

adadnarari3_1001

Hulin, Sumer 26 pp. 127-31

A stele fragment found in the village Pāra, in the western part of the Jebel Sinjar, shows the bottom part of a figure in relief and part of the text, which might be ascribed to one of three Assyrian rulers, Ashurnasirpal II, Shalmaneser III, and Adad-nārārī III.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004778/] of Adad-nārārī III 1001.

Source: IM -

Bibliography

1970 Hulin, Sumer 26 pp. 127-31 (photo, copy, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 141 (study)
1982 Börker-Klähn, Bildstelen no. 168 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 224 A.0.104.1001 (edition)


1002

adadnarari3_1002

BM 128355 (© The Trustees of the British Museum)

A clay cone fragment form the Ištar temple at Nineveh has a short text which makes reference to the "son of Šamī-Adad," which made Grayson tentatively ascribe the text to Adad-nārārī III. A mention to Tukulti-Ninurta, king of Assyria seems to refer to the ruler as an earlier builder. Not enough of the text has been preserved to warrant an edition.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004779/] of Adad-nārārī III 1002.

Source: BM 128355 (1932-12-10, 0612)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 103 and pl. LXXIX no. 219 (copy, edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 527 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 63 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 64 n. 262 (study)
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 p. 16 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 p. 117 (study)


1003

adadnarari3_1003

BM 120429 © The Trustees of the British Museum

A very small fragment of a black stone obelisk from Nineveh preserves traces of two lines of an inscription and a scene in relief representing the upper part of a man's body holding a bowl above his head. The only decipherable signs in the text are those of the name of Zakur (mza-ku-r[i]>), probably Zakur of Ḫamat (see text no. 2: 4 [/riao/Q004750.4/]).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004780/] of Adad-nārārī III 1003.

Source: BM 120429

Bibliography

1875 G. Smith, Assyrian Disc. pp. 141 and 430 (provenance)
1981 Reade, Iraq 43 pp. 151-52 and pl. XXc (photo, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 225 A.0.104.1003 (study)


2001

adadnarari3_2001

Ass 15712

This singular text is engraved on a stele (Ass 15712) in the row of steles discovered at Assur. It is of Semiramis, wife of ŠamšI-Adad V and mother of Adad-nārāri III.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004781/] of Adad-nārārī III 2001.

Source: Ass 15712

Bibliography

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen no. 5 (photo, copy, edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§730-31 (translation)
1947 Böhl, Chrestomathy p. 18 no. 11 (copy)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 111 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 226 A.0.104.2001 (edition)


2002

adadnarari3_2002

BM 11889 and 118888 © The Trustees of the British Museum

Two stone anthropomorphic statues (ca. 160 cm in height each) found in the Nabû temple at Nimrud were inscribed with the text edited here. Two further similar, but uninscribed, statues were also found with them. Bēl-tarṣi-ilumma, governor of Nimrud, authored the inscription, dedicating it to the life of king Adad-nārārī III and his mother Šammuramat/Semiramis.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004782/] of Adad-nārārī III 2002.

Sources: (1) BM 118888 (1856-09-09, 0064)      (2) BM 118889 (1856-09-09, 0065)

Bibliography

1861 1 R pl. 35 no. 2 (copy)
1885-88 Hommel, Geschichte Babyloniens und Assyriens p. 630 (translation)
1889 Abel, KB 1 pp. 192-93 and 217 (edition)
1890 Abel and Winckler, Keilschrifttexte p. 14 (copy)
1895 Meissner, Chrestomathie p. 10 (copy)
1897 Rassam, Asshur pp. 9-10 and opposite p. 12 (photo, provenance)
1907 Lehmann-Haupt, Materiaiien pp. 44-45 and pl. V no. 24 (study)
1909 Winckler, Textbuch pp. 27-28 (edition)
1911 Sarsowsky, Urkundenbuch p. 20 (copy)
1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen p. 15 n. 1 and pl. XII (study)
1920 Pinckert, LSS 3/4 no. 5 (edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§744-45 (translation)
1936 Gadd, Stones pp. 150-51 (provenance)
1938 Smith, Sculptures pls. III-IV (photo)
1957 Oates, Iraq 19 p. 29 (provenance)
1962 Strommenger and Hirmer, Mesopotamien Abb. 215 (photo)
1970 Strommenger, Rundskulptur pls. 8-9 and pp. 18-20 (photo)
1971 Eilers, Semiramis p. 34 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 116-17 (study)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumeroiogica 16 pp. 256-57 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 226-227 A.0.104.2002 (edition)


2003

This text was engraved on a cylinder seal which belonged to Bēl-tarṣi-ilumma, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī III. The text is known from impressions on clay sealings and a tablet from the Governor's Palace at Calah found in room K. The seal itself has not been recovered.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004783/] of Adad-nārārī III 2003.

Sources: (1) ND 00240(b)      (2) ND 00252(k)      (3) ND 00476

Bibliography

1955 Parker, Iraq 17 pp. 110-11 and pl. XXI no. 1 (photo, study)
1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace nos. 66, 170, and 171 (photo, copy, edition)
1990 Fadhil, Bagh. Mitt. 21 p. 481 (edition)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 p. 365 and pl. 70d (photo, edition)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 pp. 112-13 and pl. 3 (copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 227-228 A.0.104.2003 (edition)


2004

This text is engraved on a mace head which belonged to Bēl-tarṣi-ilumma, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī III.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004784/] of Adad-nārārī III 2004.

Source: Foroughi -

Bibliography

1962 Dossin, Iranica Antiqua 2 pp. 162-63 and pl. XXX no. 27 (photo, edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 83 (study)
1969 Calmayer, Datierbare Bronzen p. 92 no. 45A and p. 166 no. 89 (edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 117 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 228 A.0.104.2004 (edition)


2005

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal of unknown provenance which belonged to Bēl-tarṣi-ilumma, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī III.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004785/] of Adad-nārārī III 2005.

Source: MAF 14358

Bibliography

1900 Winckler, OLZ 3 433-34 (copy, edition, earlier bibliography)
1910 Ward, Seals no. 767 (copy, study)
1915 Scheil, RA 12 pp. 55-56 (copy, edition)
1927 Delaporte, Arethuse 4 pp. 62-63 and pl. VIII no. 25 (photo, study)
1938 Ungnad, RLA 2 p. 446b (study)
1987 Collon, First Impressions no. 342 (photo, study)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 p. 365 and pl. 71a (photo, edition)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 116 and pl. 4 (photo, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 229 A.0.104.2005 (edition)


2006

This text is engraved on a black stone cylinder of unknown provenance which belonged to Nergal-ēriš, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī III. It is decorated with two white bands and has a hole made lengthwise through the middle.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004786/] of Adad-nārārī III 2006.

Source: NBC 03174

Bibliography

1990 Galter, Iraq 52 pp. 47-48 (photo, copy, edition)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 p. 363 (copy, edition)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 112 (copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 229 A.0.104.2006 (edition)


2007

This text is engraved on a stone mace found at Ashur. According to Weidner, this is a dedicatory inscription to the god Nergal by Nergal-ēreš, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī III and "a governor of the lands Ruṣapa, Laqê, (und) Suḫi", where Nergal-ēreš records an offering of a large quantity of animals and wine to the gods Ashur and Adad.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004787/] of Adad-nārārī III 2007.

Source: Ass 10274

Bibliography

1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 318 (study)
1990 Galter, Iraq 52 pp. 47-48 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 230 A.0.104.2007 (study)


2008

adadnarari3_2008

Delaporte, Bibliothèque Nationale no. 354 © CDLI

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal which belonged to Aššur-bēla-uṣur, a eunuch of Nergal-ēriš.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004788/] of Adad-nārārī III 2008.

Source: Delaporte, Bibliothèque Nationale no. 354

Bibliography

1875 G. Smith, The Assyrian Eponym Canon (London) p. 82 (translation)
1910 Delaporte, Bibliothèque Nationale no. 354 (photo, edition)
1938 Ungnad, RLA 2 p. 457 (study)
1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace p. 10 n. 28 (edition)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 pp. 363-64 and pl. 70b (photo, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 230 A.0.104.2008 (edition)


2009

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal. Its provenance is unknown. According to the inscription, Birtāiia, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī, has granted the seal to Ištar-dūri, a eunuch of Nergal-ilāiia, a field marshal and his "protector". There is an inscription of Nergal-ilāiia on a stone duckweight from Nimrud (ND 4319, see George, Iraq 41 pp. 122 and 134 and pl. XVII b-d).

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004789/] of Adad-nārārī III 2009.

Source: AO 03877

Bibliography

1923 Delaporte, CCL 2 pp. 165-66 and pl. 88 A678 (photo, copy, edition)
1932 Contenau, RA 29 p. 30 (edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1987 Collon, First Impressions no. 343 (photo, edition)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 p. 364 and pl. 70c (photo, edition)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 115 and pl. 3 (photo, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 231 A.0.104.2009 (edition)


2010

adadnarari3_2010

From Thureau-Dangin, RA 27

Two colossal stone lions found at Til Barsip (mod. Tell Ahmar) bear an inscription of Šamšī-ilu, turtānu or filed marshal of Adad-nārārī III. Note that the inscriptions do not mention any royal name, but instead record, after a dedication to various dieties, the successful campaign of Šamšī-ilu against Argišti I [/ecut/urartianrulersandtheirinscriptions/argitiisonofminuaa8andb8/index.html], king of Urartu. The text ends with a description of the erection of the lions, each more than two meters high, giving record of their names: "The lion who[...], angry demon, unrivalled attack, who overwhelms the insubmissive, who brings success," and " (The lion) Who charges through battle, who flattens the enemy land, who expels criminals and brings in good people."

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004790/] of Adad-nārārī III 2010.

Sources: (1-2) King, AAA 2 pl. XXXVII

Bibliography

1909 King, AAA 2 pp. 185-86 and pl. XXXVII (exs. 1-2, photo, edition)
1912 Thompson, PSBA 34 pp. 66-74 and pls. IV-VI (exs. 1-2, photo, copy, edition)
1930 Thureau-Dangin, RA 27 pp. 11-21 (exs. 1-2, photo, copy, edition)
1936 Thureau-Dangin, Til Barsip pp. 141-51 and pl. XXXVII (exs. 1-2, photo, copy, edition)
1953 Malamat, BASOR 129 p. 26 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 120-21 (exs. 1-2, study)
1987 Engel, Dämonen pp. 57-58 and 245 (study)
1990 Bunnens, Tell Ahmar (provenance, study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 231-233 A.0.104.2010 (edition)


2011

adadnarari3_2011

Ungnad, VAS l no. 69

A fragment of a black stone stele which is said to come from Dohuk, but it was purchased in Mosul. The fragment is engraved with an inscription which is very similar to that inscribed on text no. 2010, recording the successful campaign of Šamšī-ilu against Argišti I [/ecut/urartianrulersandtheirinscriptions/argitiisonofminuaa8andb8/index.html], king of Urartu. The text presumably ended with line 17's, which seems to contain a curse against anyone who would deface the monument.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004791/] of Adad-nārārī III 2011.

Source: VA 03295

Bibliography

1907 Lehmann-Haupt, Materialien pp. 45-47 and 177 (photo, edition)
1907 Ungnad, VAS l no. 69 (copy)
1930 Thureau-Dangin, RA 27 p. 12 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 121-22 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 233-234 A.0.104.2011 (edition)



2012

A fragment of the lower part of a stone tablet from Ashur bears an inscription that very likely belongs to Šamšī-ilu, like texts nos. 2010 and 2011. The tet records the construction of a new city beside the old city of Ashur. The city takes the name of Šarru-iddina ("The King has given to Me"), a fact that suggests that this was a royal favour granted to an honoured official, presumably the very Šamšī-ilu.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004792/] of Adad-nārārī III 2012.

Source: VA 05057 (Ass 14709)

Bibliography

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 26 (copy)
1922 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §56 (translation)
1934 Thureau-Dangin, RA 31 p. 85 (study)
1945-51 Weidner, AfO 15 p. 96 (sludy)
1964 Borger, EAK 1 p. 27 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 121 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 235 A.0.104.2012 (edition)



2013

This text is engraved on a stone bead which provenance is probably the Ashur temple at Ashur. According to the text, the bead was dedicated to the god Ashur by Šamšī-ilu, a field marshal.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004793/] of Adad-nārārī III 2013.

Source: BM 089106 (1884-02-11, 0490)

Bibliography

1987 Reade, ARRIM 5 p. 53 (copy, edition)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 p. 248 (edition)



2014

This text is engraved on the edge of a golden bowl found in a tomb in the palace area at Kalhu. The text records that the bowl is a property of Šamšī-ilu, a field marshal.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004794/] of Adad-nārārī III 2014.

Source: Fadhil, Bagh. Mitt. 21 p. 482

Bibliography

1990 Fadhil, Bagh. Mitt. 21 p. 482 (edition)



2015

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal. It records that the seal is a property of Nabû-šarra- uṣur, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004795/] of Adad-nārārī III 2015.

Source: Ashm 1922-0061

Bibliography

1966 Buchanan, Catalogue Ashmolean 1 no. 633 (photo, study)
1987 Collon, First Impressions no. 554 (photo, study)
1992 Watanabe, Bagh. Mitt. 23 p. 365 and pl. 71b (photo, edition)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 116 and pl. 4 (photo, edition)



2016

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal. It records that the seal was dedicated to the goddess Gula by Pān-Aššur-lāmur, a governor of Baltil (Ashur), for his own life and for the life of Adad-nārārī.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004796/] of Adad-nārārī III 2016.

Source: Ashm 1932-0319

Bibliography

1966 Buchanan, Catalogue Ashmolean 1 no. 630 (photo, study)
1986 Paley, Bib. Mes. 21 pp. 213-14 and pl. 48 (photo, study)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 126 and pl. 8 (photo, edition)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 pp. 239-40 and 259 (photo, edition)



2017

This text is engraved on a cylinder seal. It records that the seal is a property of Bēl-daiiānī, a eunuch of Adad-nārārī.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004797/] of Adad-nārārī III 2017.

Source: Hallo and Porada, Festschrift Mayer-Opificius p. 267 fig. 4

Bibliography

1994 Hallo and Porada, Festschrift Mayer-Opificius pp. 260-64 and 267 fig. 4 (edition, photo)
1994 Watanabe, NABU 1994/71 (edition)


2018 add

adadnarari3_2018

BM 131124 (© The Trustees of the British Museum) and the Geneva fragment (elaboration from Radner AoF 39 pp. 267-268)

Two stone stele fragments (BM 131124 and the so-called "Geneva fragment," from private collection) from Dūr-Katlimmu (mod. Tell Šeik Hammad) show a portrait of Adad-nārārī III's head in relief with divine symbols and an inscription crossing the portrait from the shoulders of the king to approximately the half of his legs. The monument is engraved with two inscriptions. For the inscription of Adad-nārārī III see text no. 5. The text edited here is engraved on the side of the stele, and is visible only from the Geneva fragment, with twenty-five preserved lines, inscribed less carefully than those of the king's inscription and separated by irregularly applied rulings. At least one missing line at the beginning. In contrast with the less elegant rendering of the inscription, the text is composed in a high literary language and vocabulary, which is reminiscent of that found in the inscriptions of Šamšī-ilu (see, e.g., text no. 2010). Furthermore, the contrast is even more evident when the text is compared with the blander royal inscription on the front of the stele. The text belonged to the powerful governor Nergal-ēreš, whose name and titles were intentionally erased at lines 3' and 4'.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q009276/] of Adad-nārārī III 2018 add.

Source: - ()private collection

Bibliography

2012 Radner, AoF 39 pp. 265-277 (edition, copy, photo, study)

Nathan Morello & Alexander Kudryavtsev

Nathan Morello & Alexander Kudryavtsev, 'Inscriptions, texts nos. 1001-2017', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2020 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/adadnarariiii/texts10012018/]

 
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