Inscriptions, texts nos. 1-21

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1

adadnarari3_1

BM 118925 © The Trustees of the British Museum

This text is inscribed on some very large slabs found at Nimrud. Exemplar no. 2 (see image) measures 195.58 x 144.78 x 15.24 cm. These slabs were originally part of the pavement, sued as door sills. The text begins with the royal name and epithets followed by an extremely long genealogy that goes back about one thousand years (cf. also the Assyrian King List [/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/assyriankinglist/index.html]). While the main exemplar ends here, the other two end earlier. According to Grayson, this fact could suggest that these slabs were the first of a series of slabs engraved with the annals of Adad-nārārī III.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004749/] of Adad-nārārī III 01.

Sources: (1) 1 R pl. 35 no. 3     (2) ICC pl. 70B      (3) BM 118925 (1851-09-02, 0035)

Bibliography

1851 Layard, ICC pl. 70 (exs. 2-3, copy)
1861 1 R pl. 35 no. 3 (ex. 1, copy)
1889 Abel, KB 1 pp. 188-91 (exs. 1-3, edition)
1890 Abel and Winckler, Keilschrifttcxte pp. 13-14 (exs. 1-3, copy)
1912 Delitzsch, AL5 p. 61 (exs. 1-3, copy)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§742-43 (translation)
1959 Weidner, Tn. pp. xiii and 44 (lines 19-20, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 116 (exs. 1-3, study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 201-203 A.0.104.1 (edition)


2 - Antakya Stele

adadnarari3_2

11832 © Luc Wouters

A stele found (127 x 52 x 31 cm) not far from the city of Antakya, in modern Turkey, in the area of the Orontes, bears and inscription which records the establishment of a border between the domains of Zakur of Hamat and those of Ataršumki of Arpad. The border is set by king Adad-nārārī III and by his field marshal (turtānu) Šamšī-ilu, who are intrensigly recorded together on the stele and who could be represented by the two fragmentary figures on the top of the broken stele. The text ends with curses to anyone who damages the monument, but also to anyone who violates the border.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004750/] of Adad-nārārī III 02.

Source: 11832

Bibliography

1990 Donbaz, ARRIM 8 pp. 5-24 (photo, copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 203-204 A.0.104.2 (edition)


3 - Pazarcık Stele

adadnerari3_3

KMT -. © Anadolu Yazıları [https://anatolianscripts.com/script/pazarcik-steli/]

A stone stele (140 x 44 x 16.5 cm) found in a village Kızkapanlı, close to modern Maraş, during the construction of the Pazarcık dam, bears an inscription recording the establishment of a border between the states of Kummuḫ and Gurgum. The obverse of the stele is engraved with the text edited here, in which a remarkable position is occupied by Semiramis, mother of Adad-nārārī III, as she is not only mentioned, but also said to have crossed the river Euphrates with his son, in order to wage war against Ataršumki of Arpad. The text on the obverse ends with curses against anyone who would violate the border. The reverse of the stele is inscribed with yet another inscription belonging to the successor of Adad-nārārī III, Shalmaneser IV [/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shalmeneseriv/index.html] (782-773 BC) (text no. 1).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004751/] of Adad-nārārī III 03.

Source: KMT -

Bibliography

1990 Donbaz, ARRIM 8 pp. 5-24 (photo, copy, edition)
1993 Timm, WO 24 pp. 55-84 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 204-205 A.0.104.3 (edition)


4

adadnarari3_4

Scheil, RA 14 pp. 159–160

A stone fragment of unknown provenance is engraved with a portion of text recording one of Adad-nārārī III's western campaigns, although it itself too broken to see exactly which one.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004752/] of Adad-nārārī III 04.

Source: Scheil, RA 14 pp. 159–160

Bibliography

1917 Scheil, RA 14 pp. 159-60 (copy, edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 451 (study)
1973 Millard and Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 60-61 (copy, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 118 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 205-206 A.0.104.4 (edition)


5 - Stele of Dūr-Katlimmu

adadnarari3_5

BM 131124 (© The Trustees of the British Museum) and the Geneva fragment (elaboration from Radner AoF 39 pp. 267-268)

Two stone stele fragments from Dūr-Katlimmu (mod. Tell Šeik Hammad) show a portrait of Adad-nārārī III's head in relief with divine symbols and an inscription crossing the portrait from the shoulders of the king to approximately the half of his legs. The monument is engraved with two inscriptions. The first inscription belongs to Adad-nārārī III and is engraved on the front of the monument on both fragments. The British Museum fragment preserves the end of the first ten lines, and the Geneva fragment, whose surface is better preserved than that of the other piece, has the beginnings of lines 9–10 and all of 11–20.
Grayson (RIMA 3, p. 206) had already noted that the phrasing of the text is very similar to that of text no. 7, and like that one, possibly continued with the name Nrgal-ēreš and a statement about the territories governed by him. And indeed the discovery of the Geneva fragment confirmed this theory, as the side of the object was engraved with and inscription belonging to this powerful governor. That inscription is here edited as text no. 2018 add.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004753/] of Adad-nārārī III 05.

Source: BM 131124

Bibliography

1897 Rassam, Asshur p. 313 (provenance)
1968 Page, Iraq 30 p. 140 nn. 7-8 (study)
1969 Hawkins, AnSt 19 p. 112 and n. 7 (study)
1973 Millard and Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 57-64 (photo, copy, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 118 (study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 p. 141 (study)
1982 Böker-Klähn, Bildstelen no. 165 (photo, study)
1973 Millard and Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 57-64 (photo, copy)
1982-85 Borger, TUAT 1 p. 369 (translation)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 206-207 A.0.104.5 (edition)
2012 Radner, AoF 39 pp. 265-277 (edition, copy, photo, study)


6 - Stele of Sabaʾa

adadnarari3_6

IIst EŞEM 02828 (from Wikipedia [https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8f/Sabaa_Stele.jpg])

At Sabaʾa, south of Jebel Sinjar was found a stele showing a portrait of the king in relief with divine symbols on the top and a text inscribed below. The particularity of this inscription is that its first part (circa two-thirds, lines 1-22) are a royal inscription, whereas the second part is an inscription of Nergal-ēreš, a governor of Adad-nārārī III.
The text begins with a dedication to the god Adad and with the king's name, epithets and genealogy (lines 1-11a). It follows a record of the "fifth year," with the campaign against Ḫatti and the submission of Damascus. These events seem to be a brief summary of the camapaigns recorded in the eponym chronicle [/saao/Q007771.58 /].
The date fo the stela can be fairly certainly deducted by the presence of the toponym Ḫindanu among those under the jurisdiction of Nergal-ēreš, since this city was added to the governor's domain in 797 BC (see text no. 9).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004754/] of Adad-nārārī III 06.

Source: Ist EŞEM 02828

Bibliography

1916 Unger, PKOM 2 (photo, copy, edition)
1917 Meissner, DLZ 55 (line 11, study)
1926 Gressman, ATAT2 p. 345 (lines 11-22, translation)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§732-37 (translation)
1935 Seidmann, MAOG 9/3 p. 31 n. 9 (line 24, study)
1936 Unger, RLA 2 p. 245 (line 24, study)
1940 Meissner, MAOG 13/2 p. 29 (line 3, study)
1943 Poebel, JNES 2 pp. 80-84 (study)
1956 Borger, Asarh. p. 8 (line 11, study)
1964 Borger, Iraq 26 p. 125 (line 5, study)
1969 Oppenheim, ANET3 p. 282 (lines 11-20, translation)
1969 Page, Orientalia NS 38 pp. 457-58 (line 11, study)
1969 Tadmor, IEJ 19 pp. 46-48 (lines 11-13, study)
1970 Donner, Festschrift Galling pp. 49-59 (study)
1972 Weippert, GGA 224 p. 157 (lines 12, 14, study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 111-13 (study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 144-48 (edition)
1982 Börker-Klähn, Bildstelen no. 163 (study)
1982-85 Borger, TUAT 1 p. 369 (lines 11-20, translation)
1990 Pomponio, Formule di maledizione della Mesopotamia preclassica pp. 42-43 (lines 26-33, translation)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 207-209 A.0.104.6 (edition)


7 - Stele of Tell al-Rimah

adadnarari3_7

Stele of Tell al-Rimah (from Wikipedia [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tell_al-Rimah#/media/File:Stele_of_Adad-nirari_III.jpg])

A stone stele from the site of Tell al-RImah, near the Jebel Sinjar, was engraved with the text edited here. The stele was discovered beside the podium of a shrine, and like the stele of Sabaʾa (text no. 6), it is decorated with a portrait of the king in relief with the head flanked by divine symbols and the text inscribed below, in this case just below the king's waist. Also similar to the case of the stele of Sabaʾa and to that from Dur-Katlimmu (text nos. 5 and 2018 add), is the fact that the first part of the inscription (lines 1-2) is a royal dedicatory inscription to the god Adad, followed by king's name, epithets and genealogy, and by a brief record of a western campaign, but from line 13 onward, Nergal-ēreš is introduced with titles and the list of cities under his governorship; the text ends with a curse against whoever erases "one name from these names." Ironically, all the portion concerning Nergal-ēreš has been deliberately erased, presumably indicating a, possibly temporary, fall into discrace of this man (Grayson, RIMA 3, p. 210).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004755/] of Adad-nārārī III 07.

Source: IM -

Bibliography

1968 Page, Iraq 30 pp. 139-53 and pls. XXXVIII-XLI (photo, copy, edition)
1969 Brinkman, RA 63 p. 96 (lines 1-2, study)
1969 Cazelles, CRAIB pp. 106-17 (study)
1969 Page, Orientalia NS 38 pp. 457-58 (study)
1969 Page, VT 19 p. 483 (study)
1970 Donner, Festschrift Galling pp. 49-59 (study)
1972 Grayson, JNES 31 pp. 215-20 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 113-15 (study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 141-44 (study)
1982 Börker-Klähn, Bildstelen no. 164 (study)
1982-85 Borger, TUAT 1 p. 368 (lines 4-12, translation)
1988 Cogan and Tadmor, The Anchor Bible: II Kings p. 335 (lines 6-12, translation)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 209-212 A.0.104.7 (edition)


8

A broken stone slab from Nimrud was discovered by Loftus in 1854 at the edge of the mound between the North West and the South West Places. The text thereon inscribed starts with royal name and epithets, but with no genealogy. Then it summarizes Adad-nārārī III's conquests (lines 5b-14) and the records of two specific events, the submission of Damascus (lines 15-21) and the king's activities in Babylonia (22-24), is still readable before the fragment is broken.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004756/] of Adad-nārārī III 08.

Source: 1 R pl. 35 no. 1

Bibliography

1861 1 R pl. 35 no. 1 (copy)
1889 Abel, KB 1 pp. 190-93 (edition)
1895 Meissner, Chrestomathie p. 9 (copy)
1909 Winckler, Textbuch pp. 26-27 (edition)
1911 Sarsowsky, Urkundenbuch p. 20 (copy)
1926 Gressman, ATAT2 pp. 344-5 (translation)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§738-41 (translation)
1958 Wiseman in Winton Thomas, Documents from Old Testament Times p. 51 (translation)
1969 Oppenheim, ANET3 pp. 281-82 (translation)
1969 Schramm, Orientalia NS 38 pp. 126-27 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 115-16 (study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 pp. 148-50 (edition)
1973 Millard, PEQ 105 pp. 161-64 (study)
1975 Freydank, Van Sinuhe pp. 157-58 (translation)
1979 Borger, TGI3 pp. 53-54 (lines 11-16, translation)
1982-85 Borger, TUAT l pp. 367-68 (lines 11-21, translation)


9

A stone tablet found in the Ištar temple of Nineveh was, according to the text (rev. 22), meant to be on display in that building, because it was inscribed with a decree granting the province of Ḫindānu to Nergal-ēreš. Neverhteless, the format of the text very much resambles that of a royal inscription. The text starts with royal name and genealogy (obv. 1-3) followed by the abovementioned decree and a series of related statements.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004757/] of Adad-nārārī III 09.

Source: BM 136974 (1881-02-04, 0029)

Bibliography

1933 Thompson, AAA 20 pp. 113-14 and pls. XCVIII-C no. 105 (copy, edition)
1969 Postgate, Royal Grants pp. 115-17 (edition)
1973 Postgate, Orientalia NS 42 p. 444 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 117-18 (study)
1981-82 Reade and Walker, AfO 28 pp. 117-18 (photo, edition)


10

adadnarari3_10

AfO 7 p. 268

Various small cylinders of precious materials were found at Ashur. Many bear an inscription of Adad-nārārī III (see also text no. 11). Many others one of Šamī-Adad V (texts nos. 5-8).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004758/] of Adad-nārārī III 10.

Sources: (1) Ass 01202c      (2) Ass 01202d      (3) VA Ass 01730 (Ass 12880a)      (4) Ass 01200c (Ist EŞEM 02340 or Ist EŞEM 02770)      (5) Ass 01200d (Ist EŞEM 02340 or Ist EŞEM 02770)      (6) Ass 01200f (Ist EŞEM 02340 or Ist EŞEM 02770)      (7) Ass 01202i      (8) Ass 01202k      (9) Ass 01202l      (10) Ass 01202m      (11) VA Ass 01733 (Ass 12883a)      (12) VA Ass 01733 (Ass 12883b)      (13) BM 102406 (1906-10-13, 0001)     (14) VA Ass 01730 (Ass 12880b)      (15) VA Ass 01731 (Ass 12881b)

Bibliography

1904 Andrae, MDOG 22 pp. 19 and 21 (provenance)
1908 Andrae, MDOG 36 pp. 37-38 (provenance)
1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 nos. 35-36 (exs. 1-2, 4-10, copy)
1922 Andrae, AIT p. 4 (study)
1923 Meissner, OLZ 26 618 (study)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§747-48 (translation)
1931-32 Weidner, AfO 7 pp. 267-68 (photo, study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 118 (study)
1986 Pedersén, Archives 2 p. 30 n. 5 (provenance)
1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-30 nos. 25-39 (exs. 1-15, edition)
1991 Donbaz, NABU no. 107 (edition)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 p. 247 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 216-217 A.0.104.10 (edition)


11

adadnarari3_11

Ist EŞEM 04831

Two small stone cylinders from Ashur bear this text, which is an abbreviated version of text no. 10.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004759/] of Adad-nārārī III 11.

Sources: (1) Ist EŞEM 04831      (2) Ist EŞEM 04841

Bibliography

1991 Donbaz, NABU no. l07 (exs. 1-2, copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 217 A.0.104.11 (edition)


12

adadnarari3_12

VA Ass 04302a

Some bricks from Ashur are stamped with this inscription recording Adad-nārārī III's works on the facing of the Aššur temple. Note that the geometric drawing on the side of the inscription is part of the stamp.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004760/] of Adad-nārārī III 12.

Sources: (1) VA Ass 04302a      (2) VA Ass 04302b      (3) VA Ass 04302c      (4) Ass 04663

Bibliography

1905 Andrae, MDOG 26 pp. 62-63 (ex. 4, provenance)
1905 Andrae, MDOG 27 pp. 9 and 18 (ex. 4, study)
1905 Andrae, MDOG 29 p. 39 (ex, 4, study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 118 (study)
1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 nos. 337-39 (exs. 1-3, study)
1985 Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 no. 123 (ex. 1, copy)
1986 Galter, ZA 76 p. 304 (study)
1988 Kessler, BiOr 45 627 (ex. 1, study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 218 A.0.104.12 (edition)


13

adadnarari3_13

BM 137493 © The Trustees of the British Museum

These bricks coming from Nineveh are inscribed with a text that records Adad-nārārī III finishing the palace started by his father Šamšī-Adad V.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004761/] of Adad-nārārī III 13.

Sources: (1) BM 137493 (1932-12-10, 0037)      (2) Ashm 1930-0719      (3-4) AAA 19 p. 115

Bibliography

1931 Thompson, AAA 18p.100 and pl. XIX no. 39 (copy, edition)
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 115 Y (1) (study)
1965 Seux, RA 59 p. 16 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1981 Walker, CBI no. 165 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 218-219 A.0.104.13 (edition)


14

adadnarari3_14

BM 137463 © The Trustees of the British Museum

This text, inscribed on bricks from Nineveh, records work on the Nabû temple there.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004762/] of Adad-nārārī III 14.

Sources: (1) BM 137463 (1929-10-12, 0173)      (2) BCM 0333-079      (3) BCM 0332-079      (4) BCM 0355-079      (5) BCM A 059-087      (6) BCM A 060-087      (7) BCM A 061-087      (8-12) Arch. 79 no. 66

Bibliography

1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 123 and pl. XLIV nos. 66-67 (exs. 1? and 8-13, copy)
1931 Thompson, AAA 18 pl. XX no. 48 (exs. 4, 7, copy)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1981 Walker, CBI no. 164 (exs. 1-4, edition)
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 pp. 9 and 12 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 219-220 A.0.104.14 (edition)


15

Adadnerari3_15

BM 090742 (ex. 3) © The Trustees of the British Museum.

Text inscribed on numerous bricks from Nineveh. Exemplar no. 1 was found at Neb Yunus, while most of the others come from Kuyunjik.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004763/] of Adad-nārārī III 15.

Sources: (1) BM 090266 (1979-12-20, 0164)      (2) BM 090463 + BM 090464 (1979-12-20, 0265)      (3) BM 090742 (1979-12-20, 0333)      (4) BM 137466 (1929-10-12, 0177)      (5) Ashm 1930-0718      (6) BCM 0335-079      (7) Arch 79 no. 68      (8) AAA 18 p. 100 no. 39 (a)      (9–11) AAA 19 p. 115 Y (2)

Bibliography

1861 1 R pl. 35 no. 4 (ex. 1, copy)
1889 Abel and Schrader, KB 1 pp. 188-89 (ex. 1, edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §746 (ex. 1, translation)
1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 123 and pl. XLIV no. 68 (exs. 4, 7, copy)
1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 100 no. 39 (a) (exs. 6, 8, study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 220-221 A.0.104.15 (edition)


16

adadnarari3_16

BM 132264(ex. 2) © The Trustees of the British Museum.

This label is stamped on bricks found in the bathroom of Adad-narari's palace at Calah.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004764/] of Adad-nārārī III 16.

Sources: (1) Ashm 1957-0185 (ND 03499)      (2) BM 132264 (1958-02-08, 0007; ND 03499)

Bibliography

1953 Wiseman, Iraq 15 p. 149 and pl. XV (copy, translation)
1954 Mallowan, Iraq 16 p. 155 (provenance)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1981 Walker, CBI no. 163 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 221 A.0.104.16 (edition)


17

The text of an inscribed brick found in a bathroom (not the same as A.0.104.16) at Fort Shalmaneser (NW 3) has not been published.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004765/] of Adad-nārārī III 17.

Source: Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 F (ND -)

Bibliography

1966 Mallowan, Nimrud pp. 384 and 402 (provenance)
1984 Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 F (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 222 A.0.104.17 (edition)


18

The text of an inscribed brick of Adad-narart, which was discovered at Fort Shalmaneser (S 35), has never been published.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004766/] of Adad-nārārī III 18.

Source: Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 E (ND -)

Bibliography

1961 Oates, Iraq 23 p. 7 (provenance)
1966 Mallowan, Nimrud pp. 389 and 468 (provenance)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1984 Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 E (study)
1984 Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 F (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 222 A.0.104.18 (study)


19

Two inscribed clay hands of Adad-nārārī ("Vul-nirari") were found by George Smith at Calah. The inscriptions were never published and the location of the objects is unknown.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004767/] of Adad-nārārī III 19.

Source: G. Smith, Assyrian Disc. p. 252

Bibliography

1875 G. Smith, Assyrian Disc. p. 252 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 119 (study)
1991 Frame, NABU 1991 no. 83 (study)
1984 Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 F (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 222 A.0.104.19 (study)


20

Adad-nerari3_20

IM 064209. Parker, Iraq 24 p. 39

This broken text appears on an incomplete seal impression on a clay docket found at Calah. The inscription appears in the '"negative" or "mirror" form, which means that it was engraved on the seal as a "positive."

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004768/] of Adad-nārārī III 20.

Source: IM 064209 (ND 07104)

Bibliography

1962 Parker, Iraq 24 pp. 28, 38-39 and pl. XXII 1 (photo, copy, edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 379 (study)
1993 Watanabe, Orient 29 p. 110 (copy, edition)
1984 Dalley and Postgate, Fort Shalmaneser p. 265 F (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 223 A.0.104.20 (edition)


21

This text, with a dedication to the god Aššur, is partially preserved on fragments of clay cones found at Assur.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004769/] of Adad-nārārī III 21.

Sources: (1) VA Ass 02104 (Ass 05765)      (2) VA Ass 02111 (Ass 05579)

Bibliography

1905 Andrae, MDOG 28 p. 21 (ex. 1, provenance)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 98 and 120 (ex. 1, study)
1982 Rost, FuB 22 nos. 104 and 105 (exs. 1-2, copy)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 223-224 A.0.104.21 (edition)


Nathan Morello

Nathan Morello, 'Inscriptions, texts nos. 1-21', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2020 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/adadnarariiii/texts121/]

 
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