Inscriptions, 1001-13, 2001-3

Numbers from 1001 on indicate texts which cannot be assigned definitely to a particular king, but whose dating and belonging to a ruler can be uggested (texts which cannot be identified at all are to be found in the Unidentified Fragments page).
Texts numbered from 2001 on are not royal inscriptions, but inscriptions of private nature - like, for example, a servant seal or an officer stela - which give information relevant for establishing royal names and titles.

Browse the RIAo Corpus [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/pager/]


1001   1002   1003   1004   1005   1006   1007   1008   1009   1010   1011   1012   1013   2001   2002   2003  

1001

A piece of clay tablet of unknown provenance is inscribed with a passage of Neo-Assyrian annals. Format, script, literary style and content suggest a dating in the ninth century BC. Prime candidates to date more precisely the text seem to be Aššurnaṣirpal II or Shalmaneser III, but Šamši-Adad can also be taken into consideration.

Shalmaneser3_1001.jpg

BM 090817. ARRIM 9 pp. 24-5

The obverse shows events from the first two years of reign of the celebrated ruler. The reverse has remains of a building inscription and a curse section.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004722/] of Shalmaneser III 1001.

Source: BM 090817

Bibliography

1991 Grayson, ARRIM 9 pp. 23-25 (copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 171-172 A.0.102.1001 (edition)


1002

Shalmaneser3_1002.jpg

ND 05417. Wiseman, Iraq 26 pl. XXVI

The present fragmentary clay tablet bears a piece of royal annals that seems reasonable ascribing to Shalmaneser III, especially on the basis of the place names and their orthography that very much resemble those in the ruler's inscriptions. In particular, one notes that ll. 3'-4' are similar to those mentioned in a version of the king's sixteenth regnal year (843 BC; see, text no. 6 iii 58-iv 25).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004723/] of Shalmaneser III 1002.

Source: IM - (ND 05417)

Bibliography

1964 Wiseman, Iraq 26 p. 119 and pl. XXVI (copy, edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 640 (study)
1972 Grayson, JNES 31 p. 217 and n. 6 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 118 (study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 p. 141 n. 1 (study)
1976 Borger, HKL 3 p. 27 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 172-173 A.0.102.1002 (edition)


1003

Shalmaneser3_1003.jpg

BM 089907. ARRIM 5 pp. 11-20 no. 9

A dark green (onyx) "eye-stone" of unknown provenance bears a dedication to a deity called Ḫallasua otherwise unattested, although Deller has suggested that there would be a relationship with the Hurrian name of the source of the Tigris. Such possibility would then give room for a dating of the object to the years of Shalmaneser III, in whose inscriptions the sources of the Tigris play a great role. However, the inscription might as well be dated to Shalamaneser I.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004724/] of Shalmaneser III 1003.

Source: BM 089907 (1846-05-23, 0459)

Bibliography

1922 BM Guide p. 167 (study)
1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-20 no. 9 (copy, edition)
1987 Deller, NABU pp. 56-57 no. 101 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 173 A.0.102.1003 (edition)


1004

Shalmaneser3_1004.jpg

BM 089281. ARRIM 5 pp. 11-20 no. 10

A small dark-green gem of unknown provenance is engraved with the following text, which could of course belong to Shalmaneser I as well.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004725/] of Shalmaneser III 1004.

Source: BM 089281

Bibliography

1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-20 no. 10 (copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 173-174 A.0.102.1004 (edition)


1005

Shalmaneser3_1005.jpg

HW 45. Black, Iraq 51 p. 45 no. 45.

A fragment of a clay cone found at Tell al-Hawa (HW 45) is inscribed with a piece of writing that could be a Shalmaneser III's text, like some others discovered in the same area (e.g., see text no. 41).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004726/] of Shalmaneser III 1005.

Source: IM - (HW 0045)

Bibliography

1989 Black, Iraq 51 pp. 44-46 and pl. III (photo, copy, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 174 A.0.102.1005 (edition)


1006

Shalmaneser3_1006.jpg

HW 43. Black, Iraq 51 p. 45 no. 43.

A tiny fragment from a bit of clay cone discoevered at Tell al-Hawa has an inscritpion too short to warrant an edition. Similar clay cone fragments have ben found in great nubmer at the site, and many of them are dated to Shalmaneser III (see, text no. 41))

Source: IM - (HW 0043)

Bibliography

1989 Black, Iraq 51 pp. 44-47 and pl. III (photo, copy)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 175 A.0.102.1006 (study)


1007

On the photo Ass ph 4795, a fragmentary object is visible with the inscription [... tukultī]-⸢dMAŠ MAN kiš-šá-te [...], "[... Tukultī]-Ninurta, king of the Universe." The presence of the word kiššati written syllabically seems to indicate that the text should be dated to Shalmaneser III, only ruler in whose inscriptions appear such possiblity in the titles.
No edition of this text is present here.

Source: Ass ph 4795 (Ass -)

Bibliography

1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 175 A.0.102.1007 (study)


1008

A stone slab found at Nineveh has a small chip on the right edge with a text too fragmentary to warrant an edition. Borger suggested to read in line 8: [... anum-ḫi-ir]- bi zaq-pu on analogy with text no. 2 ii 10, and therefore indicated Shalamneser III as probable date of the text. However, nothing else in the traces corresponds to the passage in text no. 2 or any other narrative of Shalmaneser's first campaign.

Source: Arch. 79 no. 39

Bibliography

1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 120 and pl. XLII no. 39 (copy, edition)
1965 Borger, BiOr 22 p. 166b (study)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 536 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 96 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 175 A.0.102.1008 (study)


1009

The name of Imgur-Enlil (Balawat) is visible on a piece of wall plaque that is said to have been discovered in that same city. The particular interest of Shalmaneser III for the city could be a dating factor.
No edition of this text is presented here.

Source: IM 055701 (ND 00831)

Bibliography

1951 Wiseman, Iraq 13 p. 119 (study)
1973 Postgate, Governor's Palace p. 263 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 176 A.0.102.1009 (study)


1010

A fragmentary text no a surface flake of a tablet from Nineveh is not enough preserved to warrant an edition, but seems to concern Shalmaneser III, although it is not necessarily a royal inscription. A mention of a gold necklace (GÚ.KÙ.GI) is present at line 6'. to

Source: K 15116

Bibliography

1914 King, Cat. p. 158 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 176 A.0.102.1010 (study)


1011

A small piece of stone in the British Museum, probably from a statue, bears a Neo-Assyrian script that seems to be dated to Shalmaneser III. The broken part abvove the first line seems not to have been inscribed.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004732/] of Shalmaneser III 1011.

Source: N 1817

Bibliography

1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 176-177 A.0.102.1011 (edition)


1012

A flake of stone (13.5x3.5+ cm) in the British Museum has faint, illegible traces within several ruling lines.

Sources: BM 139428 (1983-01-01, 0003)

Bibliography

1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 177 A.0.102.1012 (study)


1013

A stone fragment from British Museum has faint, illegible traces within ruling lines.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004734/] of Shalmaneser III 1013.

Source: BM 139429 (1983-01-01, 0004)

Bibliography

1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 177 A.0.102.1013 (study)


2001

Shalmaneser3_2001.jpg

BM 090960: Elaboration from: Curtis and Grayson, Iraq 44 p. 94 and pl. III.

A stone vase fragment discovered at Tarbiṣu (Sherif Khan) is engraved with a dedication to Nergal, the city's patron diety, given by the Assyrian turtānu Bēl-lūballiṭ. He was eponym in 814 BC, a fact that could date the object to the reign of Šamšī-Adad V. However, similar dedicatory texts from Tarbiṣu are clearly dated to the reign of his father Shalmaneser III (see also text no. 2002 and Adad-nerari III text no. 2012).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004735/] of Shalmaneser III 2001.

Source: BM 090960

Bibliography

1873-75 Lenormant, Choix no. 768 (copy)
1922 BM Guide, p. 195 (study)
1927 Nassouhi, MAOG 3/1-2 p. 30 (study)
1928 Hall, Sculpture pl. LX (photo)
1938 Ugnad, RLA 2 p. 446 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 22 (study)
1982 Curtis and Grayson, Iraq 44 pp. 91-94 and pl. III (photo, copy, edition)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 p. 248 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 177-178 A.0.102.2001 (edition)


2002

A stele found among the row of steles at Ashur has an inscription that records the turtānu Bēl-lūballi (see text no. 2001), with a elaborate titulary which is also attested for Šamšī-ilu (see Adad-nerari III text no. 2010).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004736/] of Shalmaneser III 2002.

Source: Andrae, Stelenreihen no. 44 (Ass -)

Bibliography

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen no. 44 (photo, copy, edition)
1920 Forrer, Provinz. p. 8 and 23 (study)
1938 Ungnad, RLA 2 p. 439 (edition)
1957-58 Falkner, AfO 18 p. 15 (study)
1967 Gordon, JCS 21 p. 87 (study)
1970 Pales, RSO 45 pp. 21-27 (study)
1971 Postgate, BSOAS 34 p. 390 (study)
1973 Pales, Censimenti pp. 94-96 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 178 A.0.102.2002 (edition)


2003

shalmaneser3_2003

YBC 07058 (SAA S 2 pp. ii)

A clay cube which, as the inscription on it idicates, is a die for casting lots for an eponym, which belonged to Iaḫalu, an official of Shalmaneser III, who also held the office of eponym himself twice (833 and 824 BC) during Shalmasneser's reign.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004737/] of Shalmaneser III 2003.

Source: YBC 07058

Bibliography

1937 Stephens, YOS 9 no. 73 (photo, copy)
1939 J. Lewy, HUCA 14 p. 145 (study)
1949 Michel, WO 1 pp. 26.1-64 no. 20 (edition)
1956 J. Lewy, HUCA 27 p. 42 (study)
1969 von Soden, Orientalia NS 38 p. 421 n. 1 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 95-96 (study)
1980 Kessler, Nordmesopotamien pp. 170-72 (study)
1983 Hallo, Biblical Archaeologist 46 pp. 19-29 (photo, edition)
1994 Millard, SAA S 2 pp. ii and 8 (photo, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 p. 179 A.0.102.2003 (edition)

Nathan Morello

Nathan Morello, 'Inscriptions, 1001-13, 2001-3', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2020 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shalmaneseriii/texts10012003/]

 
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