Inscriptions

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1

Shamshi-Adad5_1

BM 115020 © The Trustees of the British Museum

A large stone stele depicting king Šamšī-Adad V and divine symbols in relief, was discovered by Rassam in the Nabû temple at Nimrud, although it must have originally been installed in the temple of the same city dedicated to Ninurta, as the text engraved on it is dedicated to this god. The text is inscribed on the sides and on the back of the monument, and is written with an "archaic" script very similar to the one used by the scribes of Samsī-Addu I [/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/samsiaddudynasty/samsiaddui/index.html] (ca. 1808-1776 BC) and other ancient rulers. A stone fragment from Nineveh (ex. 2) is engraved with an inscription that duplicates the one on the Nimrud stele in both content and ductus, and was possibly destined to the Nineveh Ištar temple.
The text opens with a long dedication to the god Ninurta (i 1-25), followed by the name, epithets and genealogy of Šamšī-Adad V (i 26-38). Lines i 39-53a are dedicated to the description of the rebellion against Šamšī-Adad's father, Shalmaneser III [/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shalmaneseriii/index.html], and how it was suppressed by the new ruler. This passage is followed by the description of the first four military campaigns of Šamšī-Adad V, with no indication of regnal years: a campaign against Nairi (i 53b-ii 16a); a second campaign against Nairi, but led by the chief eunuch (ii 16b-34a); a third campaign against Nairi and the Medes (ii 34b-iii 70a); a campaign against Babylonia (iii 70b-iv 45). The inscription ends abruptly, without a building section or concluding blessing and curses. J. Reade suggested (in Fales, ARIN, pp. 150-151) that the stele was originally erected beside a temple platform and inscribed in situ, and the presence of the platform prevented the scribe to finish the text. This campaign should be dated to 814 BC, and therefore the stele must be dated to 813 BC or later.
The successive two campaigns are described in text no. 2, a stone fragment from Ashur, which, although badly worn, clearly text no. 1 in its first part. A second fragment from Ashur, text no. 3, seems also to duplicate parts of the text edited here, but it is almost totally illegible.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004738/] of Šamšī-Adad V 01.

Sources: (1) BM 118892 (1856-09-09, 0063)      (2) BM 115020 (1856-09-03, 1510)      (3) VA Ass 04511 (Ass 06596)

Bibliography

1861 1 R pls. 29-34 (ex. 1, copy)
1875 G. Smith, Assyrian Disc. p. 74 (ex. 1, provenance)
1884 Delitzsch, Die Sprache der Kossäer p. 50 n. 2 (iii 45-64, study)
1884 Perrot and Chipiez, Histoire d'Art fig. 306 (ex. 1, photo)
1886 Bezold, Literatur pp. 76-77 (ex. 1, study)
1889 Scheil, Šamši-Rammân IV (ex. 1, edition)
1889 Abel in Schrader, KB 1 pp. 174-87 (ex. 1, edition)
1897 Rassam, Asshur pp. 11 and 14 (photo, provenance)
1922 BM Guide p. 72 no. 250 (ex. 2, study)
1925 Schäfer and Andrae, Die Kunst des Alten Orients2 no. 516 (photo)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§713-26 (exs. 1-2, translation)
1936 Gadd, Stones pp. 149-50 (ex. 1, provenance)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 366 (ex. 1, study)
1968 Page, Iraq 30 p. 140 n. 9 (ex. 2, study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 106-109 (exs. 1-2, study)
1973 Tadmor, Iraq 35 p. 141 n. 1 (ex. 2, study)
1981-82 Reade and Walker, AfO 28 pp. 114-16 (ex. 2, photo, edition)
1982 Börker-Klähn, Bildstelen nos. 161-62 (exs. 1-2, photo, study)
1984 Postgate, Sumer 40 p. 158 (iii 70-iv 16, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 180-188 A.0.103.1 (edition)


2

Shamshi-Adad5_2

Weidner, AfO 9 pp. 89-101

A broken stone stele was found at the Anu-Adad temple in Ashur. It is engraved with a badly worn inscription, which is very difficult to read, especially in its columns i, ii and iv. However, the decipherment of the few readable traces of columns i and ii have confirmed that they are duplicates of parts of text no. 1. These parts are treated as exemplar no. 3 of text no. 1:
Text no. 2 i 2-56 = text no. 1 i 41-iii 4
Text no. 2 ii last ten lines =. Text no. 1 iv 36-4
Column iii on the right, narrow side of the fragment, is easier to read, and its edition is presented here. This text is a fortunate addition to text no. 1, which was interrupted in the middle of the account of Šamšī-Adad's fourth campaign, and it records the fifth and the sixth campaign of this ruler. Then, at line iv 29, the text begins with a new paragraph introduced by the sentence ina ūmišuma "at that time," followed by six ruled empty lines, showing that the inscription was never finished.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004739/] of Šamšī-Adad V 02.

Source: VA Ass 04511 (Ass 06596)

Bibliography

1905 Delitzsch, MDOG 28 pp. 31-32 (provenance)
1909 Andrae, AAT p. 78 (provenance)
1933-34 Weidner, AfO 9 pp. 89-101 (copy, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 106-109 (study)
1984 Postgate, Sumer 40 pp. 158-59 (iii 17-38, iv 11-19, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 189-191 A.0.103.2 (edition)


3

Another stone stela from Ashur duplicates – as it was reconstructed by Schramm – parts of text no. 1, namely iii 18-31. The stela was found in the Aššur temple at Ashur, and it was probably dedicated to this god. The only sources for the collation of the inscription is a virtually illegible photo, and for this reason no edition is presented here.

Source: Ass 17137a

Bibliography

1955 Haller, Heiligtümer p. 66 and pl. 58c (photo, provenance)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 107-108 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 191-192 A.0.103.3 (edition)


4 - "Letter from the god Aššur"

Shamshi-Adad5_4

KAH 2 no. 142

A fragment of a clay tablet from Ashur is inscribed with part of a "letter from a god," most probably Aššur addressed to Šamšī-Adad V. The format of the text is based, like for other similar examples of this particular genre, on the repetition of the records of the events, just like what happens in the letters from the royal correspondence. First the god quotes ("With regard to what you wrote to me, as follows: '[I marched] to Dēr...' ") the report on a campaign as given by the king. Then the god confirm the validity of the king's action and repeats the report in the second person ("By the command of my great divinity it came about that: [You marched to Dēr].")
The survived portion of the text begins in the midst of the narrative of the fifth campaign (lines 1'-20'), which can be partly reconstructed through comparison with text no. 2 (iii 29'-48'// text no. 4: 2'-9'). The text, then, continues with what is probably the account of the sixth campaign, although it does not match with what reported in text no. 2 (iv 11'-29').

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004741/] of Šamšī-Adad V 04.

Source: VAT 09628

Bibliography

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 142 (copy)
1933-34 Weidner, AfO 9 pp. 101-104 (edition)
1936 Nougayrol, RA 36 p. 33 n. 4 (study)
1960 Oppenheim, JNES 19 p. 145 n. 22 (study)
1971 Burger, RLA 318 pp. 575-76 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 109 (study)
1980 Grayson, Orientalia NS 49 p. 158 n. 88 (study)
1983 Grayson, JAOS 103 pp. 147-48 (study)
1989 Livingstone, SAA 3 no. 41 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 192-193 A.0.103.4 (edition)


5

Shamshi-Adad5_5

KAH 1 no. 31

This text is a dedicatory inscription to the goddess Bēlat-parṣi inscribed on a small cylinder found at Ashur.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004742/] of Šamšī-Adad V 05.

Sources: (1) Ass 01200a (possibly Ist EŞEM 05172)      (2) Ass 01200b (possibly Ist EŞEM 05172)      (3) Ass 01202a      (4) Ass 01202b      (5) Ass 01202f      (6) Ass 01202g      (7) VA Ass 02281 (Ass 12885)      (8) BM 102405 (1906-10-13, 0002)      (9) Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 pp. 246-247

Bibliography

1904 Andrae, MDOG 22 pp. 19 and 21 (provenance)
1908 Andrae, MDOG 36 pp. 37-38 (provenance)
1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 31 (exs. 1-6, copy)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§727-28 (translation)
1973 Brinkman, JNES 32 pp. 44-45 no. 2 (ex. 9, copy, edition)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 109 (study)
1986 Pedersén, Archives 2 p. 30 n. 5 (provenance)
1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-30 nos. 11-18 (exs. 1-9, edition)
1991 Donbaz, NABU no. 107 (edition)
1994 Watanabe, Acta Sumerologica 16 pp. 246-47 (ex. 9, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 194 A.0.103.5 (edition)


6

Shamshi-Adad5_6

KAH 1 no. 32

This text is a dedicatory inscription to the goddess Bēlat-parṣi inscribed on a small cylinder found at Ashur.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004743/] of Šamšī-Adad V 06.

Sources: (1) Ass 01202h      (2) VA Ass 01734 (Ass 12884)      (3) Brinkman, JNES 32 pp. 44-45

Bibliography

1911 Messerschmidt, KAH 1 no. 32 (ex. l, copy)
1973 Brinkman, JNES 32 pp. 44-45 (ex. 3, copy, edition)
1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-30 nos. 19-20 (exs. 1-3, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 195 A.0.103.6 (edition)


7

Shamshi-Adad5_7

KAH 1 no. 33

This text is a dedicatory inscription to the goddess Bēlat-parṣi inscribed on a small cylinder found at Ashur. Although Šamšī-Adad V does not mention his predecessors in this text, it clearly belongs to him since it is very similar to the texts no. 5 [http:/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/index.html#shamshiadad505] and 6. [http:/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/index.html#shamshiadad506]

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004744/] of Šamšī-Adad V 07.

Sources: (1)Ass 01200e      (2)Ass 01202e      (3)VA Ass 01731 (Ass 12881a)      (4)VA Ass 01731 (Ass 12881c)

Bibliography

1911 Messerschmidt, KAH l no. 33 (exs. l-2, copy)
1987 Galter, ARRIM 5 pp. 11-30 nos. 21-24 (exs. 1-4, edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 195-196 A.0.103.7 (edition)


8

This text is a dedicatory inscription to the goddess Bēlat-parṣi inscribed on a small limestone cylinder found at Ashur. The inscription represents a shorter version of the texts no. 5 [http:/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/index.html#shamshiadad505], 6 [http:/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/index.html#shamshiadad506] and 7 [http:/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/index.html#shamshiadad507].

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004745/] of Šamšī-Adad V 08.

Source: Ist EŞEM 04232

Bibliography

1991 Donbaz, NABU no. 107 (edition)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 196 A.0.103.8 (edition)


9

This palace foundation inscription is attested on bricks found at Nineveh and at Ashur, one of which was discovered with the sarcophagus of Šamšī-Adad V, as well as on a piece of a clay cone found at Nineveh and on the sarcophagus of the king. Šamšī-Adad V calls himself „king of Sumer (and) Akkad", which indicates that the text was composed after he started invading Babylonia (ca. 814-811 BC), i.e. late in the reign. This is confirmed by the fact that the text was engraved on his sarcophagus (Grayson 1996 RIMA 3 p. 197)

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004746/] of Šamšī-Adad V 09.

Sources: (1)BM 045607 (1881-07-01, 3396)      (2)BM 123525 (1932-12-10, 0468)      (3)BM 128162 (1929-10-12, 0818)      (4)BM 128189 (1929-10-12, 0845)      (5)BM 137435 (R 055)      (6)BM 137464 (1929-10-12, 0175)      (7)BCM 0352-079      (8)BCM 0353-079      (9)BCM 0354-079      (10)BCM A 057-087      (11)BCM A 058-087      (12)Ass 22864      (13)Scheil, RT 22 p. 37c      (14)VA Ass 02282      (15)BM 128379 (1932-12-10, 0636)

Bibliography

1900 Scheil, RT 22 p. 37c (ex. 13, photo, transliteration)
1914 Andrae, MDOG 54 pp. 37-41 (exs. 12, 14, transliteration)
1929 Thompson, Arch. 79 p. 123 and pl. XLVI nos. 114 and 119 (copy)
1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 100 and pl. XX no. 44 (copy)
1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 103 and pl. LXXIII no. 107 (ex. 15, copy)
1954 Haller, Gräber pp. 173-76 and pl. 41d (exs. 12, 14, study)
1965 Seux, RA 59 p. 16 (edition)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 527 (ex. 15, study)
1968 Brinkman, PKB p. 213 n. 1323 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 65 (ex. 15, study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 pp. 96 (ex. 15, study) and 109-10 (study)
1981 Walker, CBI no. 161 (exs. 1-9, edition)
1984 Frame, ARRIM 2 pp. 10, 12, and 14 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 197-198 A.0.103.9 (edition)


10

Shamshi-Adad5_10

Mallowan, Nimrud 2 p. 596

This broken text is attested on a piece of an ivory strip found at Calah. The preserved part contains the genealogy of Šamšī-Adad V.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004747/] of Šamšī-Adad V 10.

Source: ND 10152

Bibliography

1962 Oates, Iraq 24 p. 3 (translation)
1966 Mallowan, Nimrud 2 pp. 594 and 596 (photo, translation)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 110 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 198 A.0.103.10 (edition)


2001

This text is inscribed on an amulet of blue stone found at Byblos. According to the inscription, the amulet is a property of Ili-ittīya, a eunuch of Šamšī-Adad V. Only the first three lines, which record the owner and the titles of Šamšī-Adad V, are edited here. The rest of the inscription contains incantations.

[Alexander Kudryavtsev]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004748/] of Šamšī-Adad V 2001.

Source: Byblos 19041

Bibliography

1969 Dossin, MUSJ 45 pp. 250-55 (copy, edition)
1971 Nougayrol, RA 65 pp. 173-74 (photo, edition)
1973 Brinkman, JNES 32 p. 46 (study)
1973 Schramm, EAK 2 p. 110 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 64 n. 262 (study)
1980-83 Farber, RLA 6 p. 441 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 2 p. 117 (study)
1996 Grayson, RIMA 3 pp. 198-199 A.0.103.2001 (edition)


Nathan Morello & Alexander Kudryavtsev

Nathan Morello & Alexander Kudryavtsev, 'Inscriptions', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2020 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/shamshiadadv/inscriptions/]

 
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