Texts nos. 1001-1019

Browse the RIAo Corpus [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/pager/]


1001   1002   1003   1004   1005   1006   1007   1008   1009   1010   1011   1012   1013   1014   1015   1016   1017   1018   1019  

1001

Tiglathpileser1_1001

BM 135910

A fragmentary inscription is written on a piece of clay tablet of unknown provenance. The text belongs to a version of Middle-Asssyrian or early Neo-Assyrian annals, which Grayson (RIMA 2, p. 71) attributes to Tiglath-pileser I.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005956/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1001.

Source: BM 135910

Bibliography

1975 Grayson, Iraq 37 pp. 71-74 (copy, edition)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 71-72 A.0.87.1001 (edition)


1002

Tiglathpileser1_1002

BM 123387

A piece of clay tablet found at Nineveh is inscribed with a fragmentary inscription from an annalistic text attributed by Grayson (RIMA 2, p. 72) either to Tiglath-pileser I or to sombedy slightly later.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005957/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1002.

Source:BM 123387 (1932-12-10, 0330)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 21 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 72-73 A.0.87.1002 (edition)


1003

Tiglathpileser1_1003

BM 123391

A piece of clay tablet from Nineveh is inscribed with a fragmentary text from the annals of a king from eleventh to ninth century BC, and attributed by Grayson (RIMA 2, p. 73) to Tiglath-pileser I.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005958/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1003.

Source: BM 123391 (1932-12-10, 0334)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 22 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 73-74 A.0.87.1003 (edition)


1004

This tiny piece of clay tablet bears what seems to be the fragmentary remains of a text of Tiglath-pileser. The fragment is 5 × 3+ cm and may come from the upper right corner of a tablet, but this is rather uncertain. Although the provenance of the tablet is not recorded, it likely comes from Nineveh. The text is so fragmentary that no translation is warranted.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005959/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1004.

Source: K 02842

Bibliography

1891 Bezold, Cat. 2 p. 480 (study)
1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 74 A.0.87.1004 (edition)


1005

The object in question was not available for study and thus no edition is given here. The text is written on a piece of clay tablet (3.2 × 5.5+ cm), found in Nineveh. The inscription is, however, poorly preserved to the point that it is largely illegible and thus does not warrant an edition. Any link to Tiglath-pileser I is, as such, very tentative. The identification with this period is supported by the fact that the piece is covered by a white slip, however -- unlike many other tablets of this period -- the clay underneath it is not red.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005960/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1005.

Source: K 04468

Bibliography

1891 Bezold, Cat. 2 p. 635 (study)
1898 Winckler, OLZ 1 69 (study)
1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1990 Millard, ARRIM 8 (copy)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 75 A.0.87.1005 (edition)


1006

As is the case with text no. 1005, not enough of the text written on this piece of clay tablet (5 × 8+ cm) was preserved to warrant edition. Furthermore, the object itself was not available for study. As with text no. 1005, the tablet was found in Nineveh. Any identification with Tiglath-pileser must be fairly tentative, however the script is similar to that of other inscriptions from the ninth and tenth centuries. Furthermore, the script on obv. 12' [... aš-šu]r(?)-TI.LA A [...] bears a resemblance to text no. 12 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005937/] line 26', although it is clear that this fragment is not a copy of that text.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005961/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1006.

Source: BM 098572 (Th 1905-04-09, 0078)

Bibliography

1914 King, Cat. p. 58 (study)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 111 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1990 Millard, ARRIM 8 (copy)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 75 A.0.87.1006 (edition)


1007

The text presented here is written on a broken clay cone and comes from Ashur. Texts nos. 1007, 1008 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005963/], 1009 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005964/] and 1010 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005965/] seem likely to be exemplars of the same text, however this is not certain because it is difficult to match them line for line. As such, the text of each object is here edited separately.

Although the text is fragmentary, an identification with the reign of Tiglath-pileser I is supported by the mention of Ilu-šūma [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/ilushumma/index.html], Shalmaneser (I) [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/shalmaneseri/index.html], and Aššur-dān (I) [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashurdani/index.html]. It is probably the case that the structure cited in the text (although the name itself is not preserved) is the Old Assyrian Ištar Temple, as texts of Ilu-šūma [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromcolonytocitystate23341809bc/ilushumma/index.html] refer only to this structure. The other sovereigns who mention undertaking building works on the temple are Sargon I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005644/], Puzur-Aššur III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005697/], Adad-nārārī I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005752/], Shalmaneser I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005794/], Tukulti-Ninurta I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005847/], and Tiglath-pileser I. This conclusion follows Grayson, RIMA 2, and Saporetti, Eponimi, as Saporetti placed the eponym Aššur-kēna-šallim at roughly the period of Tiglath-pileser I.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005962/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1007.

Source: Ist A 03449 (Ass 06719)

Bibliography

1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 312 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 115 (copy, edition)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 75-76 A.0.87.1007 (edition)


1008

See introduction to text no. 1007.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005963/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1008.

Source: Ist A 03588 (Ass 16474)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 116 (copy, edition)
1988 Deller, JAOS 108 p. 516 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 76-77 A.0.87.1008 (edition)


1009

See the introduction to text no. 1007.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005964/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1009.

Source: Ist A 03611 (Ass 18474)

Bibliography

1939-41 Weidner, AfO 13 p. 312 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 117 (copy, edition)
1988 Deller, JAOS 108 p. 516 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 77 A.0.87.1009 (edition)


1010

See the introduction to text no. 1007. This inscription is somewhat different from texts nos. 1007, 1008 and 1009 as it is written in "archaic" script.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005965/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1010.

Source: Ist A 03529 (Ass 11601)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 118 (copy, edition)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 77-78 A.0.87.1010 (edition)


1011

Tiglathpileser1_1011

VA Ass 03238c

A broken brick from Ashur bears an unusual text. No royal name or mention of the palace nor dedication to deity begins the text. Grayson (RIMA 2, p. 78) proposed a lacuna at the top of it, but no physical trace of break is present. The scholar also attributes this brick to Tiglath-pileser I (for discussion, see RIMA 2, p. 78).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005966/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1011.

Source: VA Ass 03238c

Bibliography

1984 Marzahn and Rost, Ziegeln 1 no. 165 (study)
1985 Rost and Marzahn, VAS 23 no. 36 (copy)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 78-79 A.0.87.1011 (edition)


1012

Two brick fragments from Nineveh bear this very broken and fragmentary text. The royal name in the first line leaves some room for doubt, as it could be that of either Tiglath-pileser (I) or Tukultī-Ninurta (II) [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria1114884bc/tukultininurtaii/index.html]. According to Thompson, the bricks were found in "Chamber II, N.E. wall" in the "Asn. Palace". Unfortunately the fragments in question have not been located.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005967/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1012.

Source: AAA 18 no. 25

Bibliography

1931 Thompson, AAA 18 p. 98 and pl. XIX no. 25 (copy, provenance)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 40 n. 182 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 79 A.0.87.1012 (edition)


1013

This stele comes from the row of steles at Ashur, but is badly preserved to the degree that none of the signs can be read with much confidence. As such, it cannot be ascribed to any one king with certianty. Andrae puts forward the theory that it is a stele of Ashurnasirpal II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/ashurnasirpalii/index.html], due to its position relative to other steles that it has been possible to idenify. However, Herzfeld prefers indentification with Tiglath-pileser I and, as a stele of Ashurnasirpal II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/theassyrianempire883745bc/ashurnasirpalii/index.html] of this type has already been recovered (see Ashurnasirpal II text no. 108 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q004562/]), Herzfeld's theory seems more probable. As the object is not legible, no edition is given here.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005968/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1013.

Source: Ass 15269

Bibliography

1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen pp. 30-35 and pl. XVII no. 16 (photo, copy, study)
1920 Herzfeld, OLZ 23 209 (study)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 111 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 79-80 A.0.87.1013 (edition)


1014

This clay tablet fragment measures c. 6 × 2.5 cm and was found in Ashur. It is a school copy of an inscription dedicating an object to the goddess Ninlil. It is therefore possible tentitively to link the text to Tiglath-pileser I's reign, as he is the only monarch of the early first millennium (1114-859) who definitely worked on the Ninlil shrine in Ashur (see text no. 1 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005926/] iv 32-39).

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005969/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1014.

Source: Ist A 00760 (Ass 13199)

Bibliography

1985 Donbaz, Akkadica 42 pp. 11 and 23 (copy, edition)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 80 A.0.87.1014 (edition)


1015

The texts nos. 1015-1021 all come from Nineveh and are currently housed in the British Museum. They are all written on clay tablet fragments that are too small or poorly preserved to justify an edition.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005970/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1015.

Source: Rm 0573

Bibliography

1899 Bezold, Cat. 5 p. 2202 (study)
1901-1906 Winckler, AOF 3 p. 245 (copy)
1902 King, AKA pp. 125-26 n. 3 (study)
1904-1905 Streck, ZA 18 p. 185 (study)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 pp. 111 and 121 (study)
1967 Borger, HKL 1 p. 629 (study)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 1 n. 8 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 80 A.0.87.1015 (edition)


1016

See introduction to text no. 1015.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005971/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1016.

Source: BM 128069 (1929-10-12, 0725)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 47 (study)
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pl. XXXVP (copy)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 81 A.0.87.1016 (edition)


1017

See introduction to text no. 1015.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005972/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1017.

Source: BM 134498 (1932-12-12, 0493)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 73 (study)
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pl. XXXIVP (copy)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 81 A.0.87.1017 (edition)


1018

See introduction to text no. 1015.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005973/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1018.

Source: BM 128030 (1929-10-12, 0686)

Forthcoming

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 44 (study)
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pl. XXXVP (copy)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 81 A.0.87.1018 (edition)


1019

See introduction to text no. 1015.

[Poppy Tushingham]

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005974/] of Tiglath-pileser I 1019.

Source: BM 128137 (1929-10-12, 0793)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 50 (study)
1970 Millard, Iraq 32 pl. XXXVII (copy)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 2 n. 9 (study)
1991 Grayson, RIMA 2 pp. 81-82 A.0.87.1019 (edition)

Nathan Morello, Jamie Novotny & Poppy Tushingham

Nathan Morello, Jamie Novotny & Poppy Tushingham, 'Texts nos. 1001-1019', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2020 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria1114884bc/tiglathpileseri/texts10011019/]

 
Back to top ^^
 
© RIAo, 2015-. RIAo is based at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Historisches Seminar (LMU Munich, History Department) - Alexander von Humboldt Chair for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East. Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/] license, 2007-17.
Oracc uses cookies only to collect Google Analytics data. Read more here [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/doc/about/cookies/index.html]; see the stats here [http://www.seethestats.com/site/oracc.museum.upenn.edu]; opt out here.
http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria1114884bc/tiglathpileseri/texts10011019/