Arik-dīn-ili

According to the Assyrian King List [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/index.html] (AKL), Arik-dīn-ili was the seventy-fifth king of Assyria and ruled for twelve years. He succeeded his father, Enlil-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/enlilnarari/index.html], to the throne. In turn, he was succeeded by Adad-nārārī I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/adadnararii/index.html]. The AKL [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/index.html] states that Adad-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/adadnararii/index.html] was the brother of Arik-dīn-ili. However, another version of the King List, the Nassouhi [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/kinglists/assyriankinglist/nassouhilist/index.html#column3] manuscript, states that Adad-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/adadnararii/index.html] was Arik-dīn-ili's son. The latter genealogy is supported by Adad-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/adadnararii/index.html]'s own inscriptions, in which he refers to himself as son of Arik-dīn-ili and the grandson of Enlil-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/enlilnarari/index.html] (text no. 1 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005738/] i 18 and 25).

Eight inscriptions of this ruler are preserved. Two inscriptions commemorate the monarch's renovation of the Šamaš temple in Aššur (text nos. 1 and 2), while three more commemorate building works on structures whose names are not preserved (text nos. 3-5). Text no. 8 is a poorly preserved narration of Arik-dīn-ili's military expeditions, which he carried out to the east, north and west of Aššur. The fragmentary nature of the text makes it difficult to categorise it with certainty. However, it has been argued that this inscription constitutes the first example of Assyrian royal annals (Weidner 1932, 148). Also Adad-nārārī [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/adadnararii/index.html] provides a summary of his father's (or brother's) activities and describes him as "extender of borders and boundaries" (text no. 1 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005738/], i 18-24).

Bibliography

Weidner, E.F., 'Arikdênilu,' Reallexikon der Assyriologie und Vorderasiatischen Archäologie 1 (1932), pp. 148-149.

[Poppy Tushingham]

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8  

1

A stone tablet found in the Šamaš temple at Aššur is inscribed with a text of Arik-dīn-ili recording his renovation of that holy structure. Because the inscription was not completed, as clearly indicated by the fact that there are six blank lines in the middle of the building account, it has been suggested that the inscription was written near the end of Arik-dīn-ili's reign and that his renovation of Šamaš's temple remained unfished at the time of his death. The king mentions that the foundations were laid in the eponymy of Berūtu. The tablet is in the collection of the Vorderasiatisches Museum (Berlin).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005730/] of Arik-dīn-ili 1.

Source: VA 05917 (Ass 18217)

Bibliography

1922 Schroeder, KAH 2 no. 29 (copy)
1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 1 (edition)
1926-27 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§64-66; 2 p. 502 (translation)
1930 Schott, OLZ 33 885 (study)
1955 Haller, Heiligtümer p. 82 and n. 152 (provenance)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 1 (translation)


2

A stone cylinder from Aššur bears a text stating that Arik-dīn-ili rebuilt the Šamaš temple. The object is in London (British Museum).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005731/] of Arik-dīn-ili 2.

Source: BM 091059 (1879-07-08, 0303)

Bibliography

1887 Winckler, ZA 2 p. 313 and pl. 3 no. 8 (copy, edition)
1889 Schrader, KB 1 pp. 4-5 (edition)
1897 Pinches (apud Rassam), Asshur p. 257 (study)
1902 King, AKA p. xix no. 2 and p. 3 (photo, copy, edition)
1907 King and Hall, Egypt and Western Asia in the Light of Recent Discoveries (London), after p. 396 (photo)
1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 2 (edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§64 and 66 (translation)
1955 Haller, Heiligtümer p. 82 and n. 153 (translation)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 2 (translation)


3

A fragment of a clay cone preserves part of an inscription of Arik-dīn-ili from Aššur. It is not sufficiently preserved to be able to determine which structure its building report commemorated. The piece is in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005732/] of Arik-dīn-ili 3.

Source: Ist A 03614 (Ass 18530A)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 26a (copy, edition)


4

A badly damaged inscription of Arik-dīn-ili is partially preserved on a clay cone from Aššur; the piece is now in Istanbul. Because little of the building report is extant, it is not certain which accomplishment of the king this text records.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005733/] of Arik-dīn-ili 4.

Source: Ist A 03612 (Ass 18477)

Bibliography

1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 5 (edition)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 5 (translation)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 24 (copy)


5

Parts of the first four lines of an inscription of Arik-dīn-ili from Aššur are preserved on a clay cone fragment now housed in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul). The name of the structure being renovated is missing.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005734/] of Arik-dīn-ili 5.

Source: Ist A 03613 Ass 18527A)

Bibliography

1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 6 (edition)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 6 (translation)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 25 (copy)


6

A piece of a clay cone discovered at Aššur has inscription of Arik-dīn-ili written on it. Only the ruler's name and genealogy are preserved. The object is now in Istanbul (Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005735/] of Arik-dīn-ili 6.

Source: Ist A 03627 (Ass 18855)

Bibliography

1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 7 (edition)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 7 (translation)
1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 26 (copy, edition)


7

A proprietary label of Arik-dīn-ili is inscribed on a brick found at Aššur. The present whereabouts of the object are not known.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005736/] of Arik-dīn-ili 7.

Source: Lenormat, Revue Archéologique 2e série 20 pp. 350-360

Bibliography

1869 Lenormant, Revue Archéologique 2e série 20 pp. 350-56 (copy)
1873-75 Lenormant, Choix no. 72 (copy)
1889 Schrader, KB 1 pp. 2-3 (edition)
1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 4 (edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §67 (translation)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 4 (translation)


8

A fragmentary clay tablet originating from Aššur preserves a text that records Arik-dīn-ili's military expeditions. Due to the object's poor state of preservation, it is uncertain if the text is a chronicle or a royal inscription with 'chronicle-like' narration. The tablet is in the J. Pierpont Morgan Library Collection of Yale Babylonian Collection (New Haven).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005737/] of Arik-dīn-ili 8.

Source: MLC 01300

Bibliography

1904 Scheil, OLZ 7 216-17 (edition)
1923 Clay, BRM 4 no. 49 (copy) and pl. IV (photo)
1926 Ebeling, IAK XIX 3 (edition)
1926 Luckenbill, ARAB 1 §§68-71 (translation)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 31 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXV 3* (translation)
1975 Grayson, Chronicles Ass. Chron. Frgm. 2 (edition)
1981 Tadmor in Fales, ARIN pp. 17-18 n. 16 (study)
1982 Postgate, RA 76 p. 188 (study)

Jamie Novotny & Poppy Tushingham

Jamie Novotny & Poppy Tushingham, 'Arik-dīn-ili', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2021 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/arikdinili/]

 
Back to top ^^
 
© RIAo, 2015-. RIAo is based at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Historisches Seminar (LMU Munich, History Department) - Alexander von Humboldt Chair for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East. Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/] license, 2007-17.
Oracc uses cookies only to collect Google Analytics data. Read more here [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/doc/about/cookies/index.html]; see the stats here [http://www.seethestats.com/site/oracc.museum.upenn.edu]; opt out here.
http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/arikdinili/