Texts nos.1001-2001

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1001   1002   1003   1004   1005   1006   1007   2001  

1001

The middle parts of nine lines of an inscription of a Middle Assyrian king, probably Aššur-rēša-iši I, are preserved on a clay cone discovered at Nineveh. The text records the rebuilding of a structure, possibly the citadel wall and one of it gates. The piece is in the British Museum (London).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005913/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1001.

Source: BM 122658 (1930-05-08, 0091)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 98 and pl. LXXV no. 153 (copy)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 105 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 17 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXXVI 12 (study)


1002

A small fragment of a clay cone found at Nineveh contains parts of the last four lines (concluding formulae) of a Middle Assyrian king, likely Aššur-rēša-iši I. The object is house in the British Museum (London).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005914/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1002.

Source: BM 122675 (1930-05-08, 0108)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 95 and pl. LXXV no. 139 (copy)
1959 Weidner, Tn. p. XV under no. 60 and p. 55 (vars. to no. 60 line 12)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 103 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 18 (study)


1003

A piece of a clay flange discovered in the Ištar temple at Nineveh contains parts of two lines of an Assyrian royal inscription. The attribution to Aššur-rēša-iši I is tentatively based on a possible connection with Aššur-rēša-iši I 2 (lines 3-4). The object is now in London (British Museum).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005915/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1003.

Source: BM 128397 (1932-12-10, 0654)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 pp. 95-96 and pl. LXXVIII no. 203 (copy)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 104 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 66 (study)


1004

A fragmentarily preserved text, possibly belonging to Aššur-rēša-iši I (since his is mentioned in line 4'), is known from a damaged clay cone found at Aššur. The text commemorates work on the double Anu-Adad temple. The piece is in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005916/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1004.

Source: Ist A 03455 (Ass 06999)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 114 (copy, edition)


1005

Part of the concluding formulae of an inscription of a Middle Assyrian king is found on a tiny clay cone fragment from Aššur. The tentative ascription to Aššur-rēša-iši I is based the fact that the extant text seems to be similar to Aššur-rēša-iši I 4 (lines 9-10). The piece is housed in the Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri (Istanbul).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005917/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1005.

Source: Ist A 03575 (Ass 15454)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 113 (copy, edition)


1006

The middle portion of the opening three lines of an inscription of a Middle Assyrian king (either Aššur-rēša-iši I or Tiglath-pileser I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria1114884bc/tiglathpileseri/index.html]) is preserved on a fragment of a clay cone originating from Nineveh and now in London (British Museum).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005918/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1006.

Source: BM 122686 (1930-05-08, 0119)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 p. 98 and pl. LXXVIII no. 197 (copy, edition)
1961 Borger, EAK 1 p. 105 (study)
1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 19 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXXVI 13 (study)


1007

A clay cone fragment from Nineveh and now in London (British Museum) may be inscribed with a text of Aššur-rēša-iši I. It seems to commemorate work on the terrace of a building at Nineveh.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005919/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 1007.

Source: BM 128191 (1929-10-12, 0847)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 54 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXXVI 15 (study)


2001

A stele from the Row of Steles at Aššur is inscribed with a short (seven-line) private inscription of one of the eponym officials from the reign of Aššur-rēša-iši I: Aššur-šuma-aṣbat, the governor of Aššur. The object is in Istanbul (Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/Q005920/] of Aššur-rēša-iši I 2001.

Source: Ass 17820

Bibliography

1910 Andrae, MDOG 44 p. 39 (provenance)
1913 Andrae, Stelenreihen p. 56 no. 52 and pl. XXI (photo, copy, edition)
1938 Ungnad, RLA 2/5 p. 439 no. 52 (edition)
1976 Grayson, ARI 2 p. 71 n. 284 (study)

Jamie Novotny

Jamie Novotny, 'Texts nos.1001-2001', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2017 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/ashurreshaishii/texts10012001/]

 
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