Uncertain Fragments (to 1115 BC)

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1001   1002   1003   1004   1005   1006-1010   1011   1012  

1001

A fragment of a clay cone discovered at Aššur is inscribed with an inscription of an Assyrian ruler. Based on its script and preserved contents, it could be ascribed to any from Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/shamshiadadiii/index.html] on. The piece is now in the Berlin (Vorderasiatisches Museum).

Source: VA Ass 02093 (Ass 21730)

Bibliography

1982 Rost, FuB 22 no. 14 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 328 A.0.0.1001 (study)


1002

A piece of a black stone from Nineveh preserves a text that is too fragmentarily preserved to be able to identify the Assyrian ruler in whose name it is written. The object, which was discovered by R.C. Thompson, is in the City of Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

Source: BCM 0218-078

Bibliography

1931 Thompson, AAA 18 no. 50 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 328 A.0.0.1002 (study)


1003

A tiny clay cone fragment from Nineveh and now in the British Museum (London) is inscribed with a building inscription of a Middle Assyrian.

Source: BM 128398 (1932-12-10, 0655)

Bibliography

1931 Thompson, AAA 18 no. 220 (copy)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 §606 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 328 A.0.0.1003 (study)


1004

A small piece of a clay cone discovered by R.C. Thompson at Nineveh bears part of an inscription of Assyrian king. The 'archaic' script suggests one of the Old or Middle Assyrian kings who sponsored construction at Nineveh. The object is housed in the British Museum (London).

Source: BM 128408 (1932-12-10, 0665)

Bibliography

1932 Thompson, AAA 19 no. 105 (copy)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 §607 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 328 A.0.0.1004 (study)


1005

A clay cone fragment from Aššur bears an inscription that was written sometime between the reign of Puzur-Aššur III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/puzurashuriii/index.html] and that of Tukultī-Ninurta I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/tukultininurtai/index.html]. The fragment is in Istanbul (Eski Șark Eserleri Müzesi of the Arkeoloji Müzeleri).

Source: Ist A 03543 (Ass 12241)

Bibliography

1984 Donbaz and Grayson, RICCA no. 250 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 329 A.0.0.1005 (study)


1006-1010

Five fragments of clay cones now in Berlin (Vorderasiatisches Museum) are inscribed with texts written in 'archaic' script. These cones from Aššur could be ascribed to any king from Šamšī-Adad III [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/fromsamsiaddutomittanicilent18081364bc/shamshiadadiii/index.html] on.

Sources: 1006 VA Ass 02119 (Ass 08657)      1007 VA Ass 02091 (Ass 08772)      1008 VA Ass 02088 (Ass 08618)      1009 VA Ass 02087 (Ass 05393)      1010 VA Ass 02092 (Ass 10062)

Bibliography

1982 Rost, FuB 22 nos. 23-25, 27 and 28 (copy)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 329 A.0.0.1006-1010 (study)


1011

A clay cone found at Nineveh may preserve a tiny portion of an inscription of Shalmaneser I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/thekingdomofassyria13631115bc/shalmaneseri/index.htm]. The object is in London (British Museum).

Source: BM 128195 (1929-10-12, 0851)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 54 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 329 A.0.0.1011 (study)


1012

A minuscule fragment of a clay cone from Nineveh bears a text written in 'archaic' script. The piece, which is now in the British Museum (London), could be ascribed to one of the Middle Assyrian kings who sponsored construction at Nineveh.

Source: BM 128159 (1929-10-12, 0815)

Bibliography

1968 Lambert and Millard, Cat. p. 51 (study)
1972 Grayson, ARI 1 LXXVII 37 (study)
1987 Grayson, RIMA 1 p. 329 A.0.0.1012 (study)

Jamie Novotny

Jamie Novotny, 'Uncertain Fragments (to 1115 BC)', The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) Project, The RIAo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2016 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/unidentifiedfragments/uncertainfragmentsto1115bc/]

 
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