Inscriptions

Jump to Simbar-Šipak 1   Simbar-Šipak 2   Simbar-Šipak 3

1 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006279/]

Two clay tablets (including one in the British Museum) are inscribed with copies of an Akkadian inscription of Simbar-Šipak; one copy may have been made around the second quarter of the first millennium BC, while the second may have been made between the late seventh and early fifth centuries BC, perhaps even during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar II [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon7/rulers/nebuchadnezzarii/index.html]. The text records that the king had a throne of mēsu-wood and ṣāriru-gold made for the god Enlil, in a shrine of his (Ekurigigal; "House Mountain Endowed with Sight") at Nippur. The text provides some background information about the project: The old throne had been constructed by the Second Dynasty of Isin king Nebuchadnezzar I [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon2/rulers/nebuchadnezzari/index.html], carried off by Arameans while Adad-apla-iddina. [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon2/rulers/adadaplaiddina/index.html] was king, and returned to Nippur by an unnamed king of Subartu (Assyria). The scribal note on one of the tablets indicates that a lamentation-priest of the goddess Ištar had copied the inscription from the original (on the metal plating of this divine throne).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006279/] of Simbar-Šipak 01.

Sources

(1) SMUI 1913.14.172 (UIOM 2499) (2) BM 082953 (1883-01-21, 0116)

Bibliography

Edition

Copy/Photo

Further information


2 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006280/]

A bronze arrow head that is said to have come from Luristan bears a short Akkadian proprietary inscription of Simbar-Šipak. The object was once in the collection of Peter Adam (London), but its current location is unknown.

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006280/] of Simbar-Šipak 02.

Source

formerly Adam 225A

Bibliography

Edition

Copy/Photo

Further information


3 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006656/]

A bronze dagger that may have come from Luristan has a short proprietary inscription of Simbar-Šipak. The object is now in the Archaeological Museum in Tabriz (Iran).

Access the composite text [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/babylon3/Q006656/] of Simbar-Šipak 03.

Source

Tabriz -

Bibliography

Edition

Copy/Photo

Further information

Jamie Novotny

Jamie Novotny, 'Inscriptions', RIBo, Babylon 3: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand, The RIBo Project, a sub-project of MOCCI, 2017 [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/rulers/simbarshipak/inscriptions/]

 
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