Related Projects

Assyrian Empire Builders [http://www.ucl.ac.uk/sargon/]
This web project, under the direction of Karen Radner of the University College London, brings together translations and transliterations of 1,200 letters that were exchanged between Sargon II, king of Assyria (721-705 BC), and his governors and magnates, and presents these letters together with resources and materials for their study and on their historical and cultural context.
CAMS: Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/cams]
Starting with tablets from Huzirina, Kalhu, and Uruk for the Geography of Knowledge project, CAMS will eventually comprise editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings.
The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative [http://cdli.ucla.edu/]
A database of cuneiform tablets from the beginning of writing until the end of the pre-Christian era, directed by Robert K. Englund of UCLA.
Digital Archive of the Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/arrim/]
Through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ARRIM Digital Archive makes all nine issues of "The Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia" (1983-1991) freely available in searchable PDF files. This digital archive is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.
GKAB: The Geography of Knowledge in Assyria and Babylonia [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/cams/gkab/]
The AHRC-funded GKAB project studies Assyro-Babylonian scholarship by editing the contents of four cuneiform libraries in the Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship and by analysing their changing socio-political contexts.
Knowledge and Power in the Neo-Assyrian Empire [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/saao/knpp]
Steered by Karen Radner of the University College London and Eleanor Robson of the University of Cambridge, this website presents Neo-Assyrian scholars' letters, queries, and reports to their kings in seventh-century Nineveh and provides resources to support their use in undergraduate teaching.
Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/oimea]
OIMEA, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which official inscriptions are edited. The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. OIMEA is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.
The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/]
Steered by Eleanor Robson of the University of Cambridge, Steve Tinney of the University of Pennsylvania, and Niek Veldhuis of UC Berkeley. Oracc comprises a workspace and toolkit for the development of a complete corpus of cuneiform whose rich annotation and open licensing support the next generation of scholarly research.
Oracc Global Sign List [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ogsl]
Provides a global registry of sign names, variants and readings for use by Oracc.
The Q Catalogue [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/qcat]
The "Qcat" provides a global registry of compositions rather than objects, supporting the creation of scores on Oracc.
The Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo) [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/riao/]
This sub-project of the LMU Munich-based and Humboldt-funded Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) Project publishes open-access, annotated editions of the entire corpus of Assyrian royal inscriptions, texts that were published in RIMA 1-3 and RINAP 1 and 3-4. This rich, digital corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. RIAo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Kirk Grayson, Nathan Morello, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.
The Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online (RIBo) Project [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/ribo/]
This sub-project of the LMU Munich-based and Humboldt-funded Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) Project publishes open-access, annotated editions of the entire corpus of Babylonian royal inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC). This rich, digital corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Rocío Da Riva and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. RIBo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus, Rocío Da Riva, Grant Frame, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.
State Archives of Assyria online [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/saao/]
An open-access web resource that aims to make the rich Neo-Assyrian materials found in the royal archives of Nineveh, and elsewhere, more widely accessible. Portals include Knowledge and Power and Assyrian Empire Builders.
Suhu: The Inscriptions of Suhu online Project [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/suhu/]
This sub-project of the LMU Munich-based and Humboldt-funded Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity (OIMEA) Project publishes open-access editions of Akkadian inscriptions from a few of the rulers of the land of Suḫu in the early first millennium BC. The project's main contributors are Grant Frame and Alexa Bartelmus.
 
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© RINAP online, 2011–. The RINAP Project is based at the University of Pennsylvania and the contents of this website have been made possible in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor, as well as additional funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Historisches Seminar – Abteilung Alte Geschichte) through the establishment of the Alexander von Humboldt Chair for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East for Karen Radner. Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/] license, 2007-14.
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